MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 18 The Abominable Snowman

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 18 The Abominable Snowman

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
What analogy has the author used for proving the existence of the Snowman? (M.P. 2014, Imp., 16)
Answer:
In this article the author makes an effort to unfold the mystery of the Abominable Snowman who has long been undiscovered with authenticity. He takes the footprints as evidence of the existence of Snowman. The analogy that he takes to prove it is that if fingerprints can decide the hanging of a man why footprints can not establish the existence of one.

Question 2.
Why did the author want to start his inquiry with Mount Everest?
Answer:
The author wants to start his inquiry with Mount Everest because it is still untrodden and has been mysterious for long strange things that happen there.

Question 3.
More evidence was provided by two persons about the existence of the Snowman in 1936. What was it and who were they?
Answer:
In 1936 one Mr. Ronald Kaulback travelled in the Upper Salween and reported having seen at 16,000 feet five sets of tracks taking exactly as though made by a barefooted man. He added that there were no bears. More evidence was tendered by wing commander Beauman who reported similar tracks from the Central Himalayas.

Question 4.
How did Mr. Kaulback react when people suggested that the footprints could be those of the Giant Panda or Snow Bear?
Answer:
When Mr. Kaulback said that the tracks which he saw were exactly made by biped, he was contradicted with the view that they were made by Giant panda or Snow Bear. At this he reacted hat he was ashamed that he had not thought of it himself. But he had not heard of Pandas in those parts nor were there bamboo shots.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 18 The Abominable Snowman

Question 5.
How did Mr. Tombazi happen to see the Snowman? (Imp.)
Answer:
Mr. Tombazi writes that “an intense glare prevented him seeing anything for the first few seconds, but soon he spotted the object referred to, two or three yards away down the valley. They were exactly like human beings. They were not wearing any clothing.

Question 6.
What was Mr. Newman’s theory about the footprints? (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
Mr. Newman’s theory about the footprints was that they belonged to men who were either outlaws or ascetics striving to obtain magical powers by cutting themselves off from mankind.

II. Answer the following questions in about 75 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
How did Mr. Smythe strengthen his claim that the footprints were those of a ‘biped’? Why did he later retract his claim and say that the tracks were made by a bear?
Answer:
Mr. Smythe was an explorer in the Himalayas. He found the evidence of the footprints. They were huge, apparently of a biped. Photographs and measurements were taken. Then in order to clinch the thing he got the Sherpa’s signature on a written statement to the effect that the tracks were those of a Metch Kangami. They added that although they had never seen one, because anyone, who does, dies, or is killed, they had seen pictures of his tracks in Tibetan monasteries.

Later when Smythe submitted his evidences he retreated his claim and said that the tracks were made by a bear. He did so because he was not sure about the Sherpas who were frightened men and could withdraw any moment. More than that there was no way to measure and prove the tracks and print.

Question 2.
Describe H.W. Tilman’s sighting of tracks in Sikkim.
Answer:
The author H.W. Tilman had on open mind on the subject. In 1938 during the course of his exploration he was in Sikkim when he saw tracks. Along with two Sherpas he was crossing the Zemu Gap, a 19,000 foot pass between Kanchanjunga and Shimu. The weather was thick, the snow soft and they plodded up a long easy snow slope when they saw a single line of footsteps. In view of the prevailing weather it could not be many days old.

Question 3.
How did the author confirm that the tracks that he had observed were not made by human beings? (Imp.)
Answer:
The author was trying to get a conclusion about the identification of the track he had seen. When he reached Darjeeling he came to know that no party had gone on the mountains recently. The last visit was made by Brigadier John Hunt. But even Mr. Hunt had been there in November. So the author got confirmed that the tracks were not of the human beings.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 18 The Abominable Snowman

Question 4.
What reasons does the author ascribe to the round shape of the footprints?
Answer:
There is a discrepancy between the tracks seen by Hunt and the author himself and those of the two previous climbers. They were circular while those seen by the author and 1 lunt resembled those made by large boots. The author in order to confirm, used his senses and said that those were not necessarily of a brute beast, but an erect being who might have came down from his tree even earlier than they did. He thinks that even bears, bees, ants are not without constructive ability so we can without doubt attribute those tracks to the Snowman.

Question 5.
Describe in your own words the sight Mr. Tombazi witnessed when he was called from his tent by his porters?
Answer:
Mr. Tombazi, having been called from his tent, saw an intense glare which prevented his seeing for the first few seconds. But soon he could spot the object two or three hundred yards away down the valley. The figure, no doubt, in outline was exactly like a human being, walking upright and stopping occasionally to uproot some dwarf rhododendron.

It showed dark against the snow and wore no clothing. Within the next minute or so it had moved into some thick scrub and disappeared. He examined the footprints which were similar in shape to those of a man but only 6 or 7 inches longer.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

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