MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 21 The Silver Box

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 21 The Silver Box

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Act – I

Question 1.
Describe the meeting between the Unknown lady and Mr. Barthwick in your own words. What is the outcome of this meeting? (M.P. 2017 Imp.)
Answer:
One morning an unknown lady tries to seek permission to meet Mr. Barthwick. She is escorted by the servant Marlow to Mr. Barthwick whom she refuses to meet. Instead she asks for Jack Barthwick i. e. Mr. Barthwick’s son. Mr. Barthwick calls for Jack in the hall to meet the unknown lady as she refuses to tell the reason to Mr. Barthwick about her meeting to Jack.

The unknown lady was a young girl with pale complexion and dark eyes. She had a pretty figure. She expresses her desire to meet Jack. Mr. Barthwick asked her the reason, for her desire to meet his son. She lodged a complain to Mr. Barthwick, that last night Jack had a quarrel with her and had taken away her crimson silk purse (reticule). This disclosure shocks Mr. Barthwick and he foresees his spending for Jack in vain (waste).

The unknown lady demands for her purse along with the money amounting to be nearly seven pounds and twelve pence. She wants her money back as she has to pay the rent to her landlady. She also threatens to complain of theft against Jack, if she does not gets the money back.

The outcome of the meeting brings out the darker aspects of the character of Jack Barthwick. Mr. Barthwick realizes the mistake of his son and tries to settle the matter by giving the girl eight pounds to cover the value of the purse and Cab fare. He said to his son that people like him are nuisance to the society and are dangerous. He lastly commented that his conduct is absolutely unjustifiable. It shows that he lost his hope for his son.

Question 2.
Write a note on the dramatic significance of the unknown lady-episode. (M.P. 2009, 11, 13, 15, 16, 17)
Answer:
The visit of the unknown lady serves a useful dramatic purpose. It throws light on lack’s character. The lady reveals that Jack is a drunkard and a debauch. He associates with prostitutes. He is also a thief. In other words he is as guilty as Jones. Thus the lady’s visit is an important link in plot construction.

Question 3.
Do you feel that Mrs. Jones attempts to defend her husband during the interview with Mr. Barthwick? (Imp.)
Answer:
Mr. Barthwick interrogates Mrs. Jones about the theft of the silver box. This reveals several vital facts about her miserable life. She has got three school going children and she can not support them. Her husband is still jobless as well as troublesome. He extracts money from her for drinking. He is a groom by profession. She had an affair with him before their marriage eight years ago. Her eldest son was born before marriage. Yes, She attempts to defend her husband.

Question 4.
What would the members of the Labour Party do, according to Mr. Barthwick, once they came to power? (M.P. 2014)
Answer:
A labour party candidate has won by election to the parliament. This gives a rude shock to Mrs. Barthwick. She blames the liberals for encouraging the common people. The political discussion reveals the attitude of Mr. and Mrs. Barthwick who represent the upper class. According to Mr. Barthwick, the members of the labour party would deprive the upper classes of their rights and property once they came to power.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 21 The Silver Box

Question 5.
Write about the appearance of the Unknown Lady in your own words. (M.P. 2014)
Answer:
The visit of the Unknown Lady serves a useful purpose in the drama. It throws light on Jack’s character, as she wants to meet. Jack Mr. Barthwick for stealing her purse. One morning the Unknown Lady enters the house. She was a young girl, with pale complexion, dark eyes and pretty figure. She wears a hat with flowers intact on it.

Question 6.
What was the reaction of Mr. Barthwick after meeting with unknown lady? (M.P. 2015, 18)
Answer:
Mr. Barthwick rebukes and scolds his son after he meets the unknown lady and pays her the money. She had in her reticule along with cab fare. He says that he had no principles and he was a nuisance to the society. His conduct was unjustifiable and he had committed a crime. He warns Jack (his son) that he would defend him next time, and that he is not fit to be helped.

Question 7.
Describe in your own words the room in which Jones lived.
Answer:
Jones in the play ‘The Silver Box’ lived in a bare room, with tattered oil cloth and damp distempered walls. It had an air of tidy wretchedness.

Question 8.
What comment did Mr. Barthwick make regarding the case of the two girls? (M.P. 2015, 18)
Answer:
On hearing the case of the two little girls, Barthwick said that it is a painful case with a very distressing state of things. He comments that the case like this should be taken up in the house i.e. the parliament. He says that it is an important question regarding the distressful condition of the people.

Question 9.
Where were the two little girls found by the police? (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
The two little girls were found, wandering in the street by the police, as their aunt had not allowed them to be in her own house. The mother of girls had left them and gone and the father was unemployed thus could not take care of them.

Question 10.
What according to Mr. Barthwick is education doing for the lower class? (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
According to Mr. Barthwick education for the lower class is ruining the lower class, as they would be at par with the higher class.

Question 11.
What did Roper ask Jack to do when he testifies in the court of law? (M.P. 2016)
Answer:
Roper advises Jack not to say anything at all in the court. He should simply say that he slept on the sofa.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 21 The Silver Box

Act – II

Question 12.
What is the dramatic significance of the conversation between Mrs. Jones and her husband? (M.P. 2009, 12)
Answer:
Mrs. Jones is a noble character, in the play, ‘The Silver Box’. She is a victim of malicious fate, for stealing a silver box. As she returns back home from her job, she finds Mr. Jones sleeping. He asks her about her early return from job. He shows his anger and frustration on her and misbehaves with his wife.

He tells his wife about the purse with seven pounds, which he picked out of spite. His wife informs Mr. Jones about the rent to be paid. Mr. Jones provides the rent with the sovereign he picked, and surprises his wife. While discussing about the sovereign and purse, she tries to fold Mr. Jones coat and drops the silver box from the coat’s pocket.

Mr. Jones tries to grab the silver box, from her and tells her that he picked it but of spite and will throw in the river. In the meantime a significant change takes place in the drama and a detective by the name-Snow enters and grabs ‘The Silver Box’.

Question 13.
What does Jones want to do with the money he has got? What does he want to do in his future life? (Imp.)
Or, What was Jones planning with stolen money? (M,P. 2015, 16)
Answer:
Jones has stolen a silk purse. It has seven pounds in it. He calls it a loss property with no name on it. As Mrs. Jones is an honest lady. She doesn’t look happy at it. But Jones has no sense of guilt. He says that he will go to Canada to change his luck. He would live a happy liffewith another lady. He would live with freedom.

Question 14.
Give an account of the way ‘The Silver Box’ was recovered from the residence of Jones. (M.P. 2009, 11, 13, Imp., 18)
Answer:
When Mrs. Jones detects the stolen purse she thinks to return it to her employer. So when jones is out she shakes out his coat. The silver box falls down from the coat packet. She looks hard at it. But Jones snatches it from her hands with a promise that he would throw it away into the river along with the purse.

On the other hand when Barthwick finds the box missing he asks Snow, a detective to search it. Snow out of doubt comes to Jones house just at the time when Jones trying to take the box from his wife who takes it to go to return it to Barthwick. Snow detects the letters J.B. Carved on it and is sure it was the stolen one from Barth wickis house.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 21 The Silver Box

Question 15.
What transpires between Roper and Mr. Barthwick? (M.P. 2010,15)
Answer:
Roper the advocate, is shown in. Barthwick tells him about The Silver Box which was stolen not by the charwoman but her loafer husband. Jones also says that Jack let him walk into the house. Jones then took away both the things The Silver Box and the purse. The news might appear in the papers the next day. Jones is likely to make full use of the purse against his family. Jack confesses so many things one by one. His mother tells him to forget the truth that he led jones into the house, offered him whisky and left the key in the lock of the door.

Roper advises Jack not to say anything at all in the court. He should simply say that he slept on the sofa. In fact he needn’t attend the court at all. Jacks feels great relief. Barthwick wants that Roper should see to it that the purse theft case is not referred to at all. Roper promises to manage the whole case. He takes leave.

Question 16.
How was Snow able to recognize that the silver box belonged to the Barthwick family? (M.P. 2014)
Answer:
Barthwick’s had appointed Snow, a detective to Trace the whereabouts of silver box that was stolen from their residence. As per suspect, snow visits Mr. and Mrs. Jones residence and rescues the silver box from Jone’s residence. He recognizes the box by the letters J.B., which was inscribed on the box, which symbolises their (Barthwick’s) initials.

Question 17.
Who is Snow? What makes Snow come to the residence of Mrs. Jones? (M.P. 2014, 16, 18)
Answer:
In the drama ‘The Silver Box’ Snow plays a vital role in recovery of the missing box. Snow is a detective, who is appointed by Mr. Barthwick to find the silver box. Snow came to the residence of Mrs. Jones with an intention to arrest her, suspecting her to be the victim of stealing the silver box.

Act – III

Question 18.
Write in your own words the proceeding of the case of the two little girls in the court. (M.P. 2011)
Answer:
The Silver Box is based on the theme of social, economic and legal evils. It focuses on the suffering of poor families as a result of unemployment and poverty. The introduction of the two, little girls shows how children suffer the most when homes break. Livens can not find a job. So his wife leaves him and her daughters. He puts them in his sister’s house. But she too can not feed them. Finally they are sent to a home for destitute children. The episode is very relevant to the theme of the play.

Question 19.
How does the case against Jones proceed in the court of law? (M.P. 2009, 13, Imp.)
Answer:
The second case listed for the day is that of James, Jones and Jane, Jones. Barthwick whispers to his solicitor Roper to avoid any reference to the purse. The two charges against the accused relate to the theft of The Silver Box and assault on the police. Jones denies that he stole the box. He admits that he attacked the police but he has to say many thirjos why he did so.

Question 20.
What were the two charges made by the police against Jones? (M.P. 2014, 18)
Answer:
The Silver Box is based on the theme of social, economic and legal evils. Snow, the detective recovers the stolen The Silver Box from Mr. and Mrs. Jones residence and takes them to the court of law. He puts two charges against them-one of stealing of the silver box and second of assaulting on the police.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 21 The Silver Box

Question 21.
What reasons did Jones provide for taking the silver box? (M.P. 2014)
Answer:
Jones is called into the witness box. He swears that he will speak the truth. Jones says that he had never before been brought to a police court.

Jones says that he took the silver box under the effect of liquor and in his fit of drunkness. He also reveals that Jack Barthwick offered him liquor and offered him to smoke and take whatever hp wishes from his room.

Question 22.
Why does Jones, towards the end of the play say, “Call this justice”? (M.P. 2015, 18)
Answer:
Mr. Jones was caught and found guilty of stealing the silver box from Mr. Barthwick’s house whereas Jack, Barthwick’s son was left untouched in spite of his involvement in the same activity.

Jones says so because he was sentenced for one month with hard labour while Jack who had committed the same offence of drinking and stealing was set free, he being a wealthy person.

II. Answer the following questions in about 60 words:

Act – I

Question 1.
What transpires when Mr. Barthwick calls Mrs. Jones for a talk? (M.P. 2011, 13)
Answer:
When Mr. Barthwick found the box missing from palace, he enquires from his servant Marlow asking about the responsibility of cleaning the room. Mr. Barthwick calls Mrs. Jones for a talk as he comes to know, that the responsibility of cleaning the room lies with Mrs. Jones.

Barthwick then interrogates about the theft of silver box. This reveals several vital facts about her miserable life. She had her school going children, whom she could not support. Her husband is still jobless as well as troubles her. He is a groom by profession which is not permanent for him.

He extracts money from her for drinking and harass her. This reveals that she leads a highly miserable life. Thus, Mr. Barthwick tries to investigate the whole affair of the loss of silver box she refuses to have any knowledge about the silver box.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 21 The Silver Box

III. Answer the following questions in about 150 – 200 words each:

Question 1.
Write a critical appreciation of the play ‘The Silver Box’. (M.P. 2010, 17 Imp.)
Or, Describe the play’s relevance in the present day circumstance.
Answer:
The Silver Box, Galsworthy’s first dramatic work, is a three act play. The author calls it a ‘social comedy’ but it is comic only in the satirical portraits of characters in the society and the law courts. Here is a bogus liberal M.P., John Barthwick who loves fine phrases and speaks as if he were addressing his voters. But he turns cool the moment his own interests are threatened. Then there is his foolish and self-centred wife who would side with her good for nothing son at all cost.

She regards Jones as a dangerous fellow. Their son Jack is thoroughly spoiled. He is a debauch, a thief and a liar. For the likes of Barthwicks life is a comedy because they wield power, position and contacts. But they are the real criminals. For poor Mrs. Jones and her children, the play is a ‘social tragedy’. In spite of her complete innocence they become victims of a horrible miscarriage of justice.

She suffers bashing by her own husband. She is arrested for the crime committed by him. Her children go hungry. Her employer accuses of stealing The Silver Box. Towards the end, she is left alone, and without a job, only to starve. Strangely enough, the dramatist calls his play a comedy, perhaps because we are left at the end smiling ironically at the unfairness of the world.

The central theme of the play is the operation of law as it affects the rich and the poor. There are two sharply contrasted groups in the play. One consists of a bogus liberal M.P., his foolish wife and his spoilt son. He has got wealth and position and outward respectability. They guard their reputation jealousy even by using unfair means. They can easily buy detectives, constables and magistrates. The scales of justice are tilted in their favour.

The other group consists of Jones, his wife and children. This family is poor, miserable and defenceless. They are charged with theft and violence. Jones is found guilty of assaulting a public servant on duty. He can’t hire any advocate to defend him. He argues his own case. But his voice is muffled, and he is sent to prison with hard labour. Jack who is equally guilty of stealing a prostitute’s purse, gets a clean chit in the court.

Thus we find in the play police, lawyers, turning of the law, and conviction of the weak. The law in our so-called civilized society, has taken the place of ancient tyrants. It crushes down the innocent.

The Silver Box is a penetrating study of life in Edwardian England. It is as true and relevant today as it was centuries ago. The law remains the handmaid of the rich and the ruling class. The poor somehow manage to keep breathing.

Question 2.
Justify the title of the play The Silver Box. (M.P. 2010, 11, 13, 16, 17)
Answer:
Galsworthy’s original title for The Silver Box was The cigarette Box. Both essentially mean the same thing – an expensive cigarette case. It is the central thing in the plot. The entire story revolves around it. Jones an out-of-work poor man is tempted one night to take it away from wealthy Jack’s house.

Mr. Barthwick first points his accusing finger at this charwoman Mrs. Jones. She discovers it by chance at her house. She insists on returning it to its owner. There is a scuffle. Jones wants to throw it into the river. At this crucial moment a detective Mr. Snow enters the room and recovers the stolen box.

He draws Mrs. Jones on charge of theft to the police station. Jones attacks the policeman on duty. He too is arrested. Both are produced in the court. The dishonest Magistrate, the constable and the advocate Roper shield Jack. Jones is convicted though not on charge of stealing the box but of assault-ing a public servant on duty.

Thus, we see the cigarette box dominates the events from cover to cover. All conflict and suffering arise from it. The word ‘silver’ gives to the title the colour of a class struggle between the rich and the poor. Silver is the symbol of riches. Hence the title The Silver Box is more appropriate and effective than the cigarette Box.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 21 The Silver Box

Question 3.
Write a character sketch of Mr. Barthwick. (M.P. 2014, 16)
Answer:
Galsworthy’s characters are neither glorious heroes nor outright villains. They are true to life. Most of them are ordinary men and women we meet with around us everday. Jack belongs to the aristocratic class, although he himself is a spoilt and dissolute young man. His father John Barthwick is a Member of the British parliament. He is rich and influential. Jack has all the advantages of his father’s status and purse. He becomes easy-going and pleasure loving. He is pampered further by his mother. He is studying at Oxford where boys drink to freely and mix with street women. And he admits this fact with shameless pride.

Jack spends money recklessly. So he is always hard up and penniless. He issues a cheque which is dishonoured by the bank. He runs the risk of prosecution for cheating or deception. He has just one shilling in his pocket when he seeks Jone’s help. So he allows Jones to drink, smoke and even take away whatever he likes. He quarrels with his father about money. He demands more money to spend recklessly on his pleasure hunting. He snatches away the handbag of a lady in a drunken fit of anger. The lady complains to his father who agrees to pay her 8 pounds.

Jack has no moral scruples. He mixes with women of easy virtue. He quarrels with one and snatches away her velvet handbag containing all her money in a purse. In the court he tells lies on inducement from his defence council Roper. He refuses to recognise Jones and pretends forgetfulness.

Jack happens to be guilty of the same offence as Jones. Both have the same weak-nesses for wine and women. Both steal and are made to stand in the witness box. But Jack is shielded by his father and the advocate. He goes scot-free while Jones get one month’s rigorous imprisonment.

However Jack is not a downright wicked villain. He is not a deliberate thief. He is a product of an unjust system and economic order. He is pampered chiefly by his mother.

Question 4.
Write a character-sketch of Jones. (Imp.)
Answer:
The Silver Box is a modem and magnificent play. It has a galaxy of characters, most of whom have their failings and vices. The only noble character who wins our sympathy and pity is Mrs. Jones. She is a good woman who wishes to bring up her children properly. She is honest, sincere and dutiful to the core. She claims no privileges and asks no favours. Yet she suffers the most. She suffers the drunken brute of a husband at home. She is falsely accused of stealing a silver box by her employer. When Jones is hauled upon charges of theft and violence, the poor Mrs. Jones is left jobless to Starve.

Mrs. Jones is slim with dark eyes and oval face. Her voice is soft, smooth and even. She is gentle and modest. She doesn’t have the aggressive nature of her husband. Her lamb-like docility annoys her husband. He calls her milky mild who hasn’t even the spirit of a louse. She accepts her lot without complaint or murmur, her self-effacement gives a peculiar grace to her personality.

Mrs. Jones is born under an unlucky star. She is a victim of malicious fate as well as society. She first suffers the tyranny of her husband who beats her cruelly in a state of drunkeness. He accuses of her being unfaithful and even threatens to cut her throat. But she bears it calmly as a good and faithful wife. She tries to spot his good points. She can not take a firm decision to leave him.

She tries to explain his violence and cruelty to his heavy drinking and unemployment. She says: “Of course, I know he has a very hard life. And he is fond of the children and it’s very hard for him to see them going without food. She affirms that Jones is kind and generous when he is sober. She tries her best to save her man from the grip of law.

Mrs. Jones is completely innocent of theft. Yet she loses her reputation as well as job. She and her children are left to starve. The court verdict hits her that hardest in three ways. Her husband is sent to jail. She loses her job in Barthwick’s house. She loses her reputation as it thrown out of her lodging.

The machinery of law crushes her. Her undeserved suffering is indeed tragic. She is simple honest and truthful. She condemns Jones’ action of stealing somebody else’s purse. She reveals frankly that she had an affair with Jones before she married him. That caused a scandal and cost Jones his job. On the whole, Mrs. Jones appeals powerfully to our sense of sympathy and pity.

Question 5.
“The play is an attack on the hypocrisy of the British higher class.” Discuss. (M.P. 2010, 12, 14, 18)
Answer:
The Silver Box presents, in fact, the on-going class war in the whole world. The Society is broadly divided into the upper class and the lower class the rich and the poor, the rulers and the ruled. John Barthwick represents the upper middle class. He is a liberal mem¬ber of Parliament.

He has lofty principles about social reforms. He wants all parties to have their representatives in the Parliament. He professes sympathy for the poor. He seems to be deeply moved during the case hearing of Livens. He decides to raise the issue of the down¬trodden in the house.

But Barthwick’s sympathy for the poor is only skin-deep. He thinks that the poor are committing the folly of distrusting the rich, and they themselves are largely responsible for their misery. “If they would only trust us (The upper class) they get on so much better”. He doesn’t realise that the poor are victims of social apathy and ruthless laws.

The Barthwick is a bogus liberal. His hypocrisy and selfishness are clearly exposed. He is mortally afraid of a public scandal. He helps his Jack out of trouble twice in order to save his own good name from damage. He seeks the help of Snow and Roper to drop the charge of theft against Jones. “Better to have lost a dozen cigarette boxes, and said nothing about it.”

He decides to make enquiries about the stolen box because it is question of his principle. But he makes Jack tell a lie in the court. At the end, when Mrs. Jones turns to him with an appeal, he turns his back upon her and goes away like a coward. The author’s estimate of Barthwick is very fair.

Question 6.
“Drinking affects the high and the low alike”. Illustrate the proposition on the basis of your study of the play. (Imp.)
Answer:
The Silver Box deals, is a family drama of two persons – John Barthwick and James Jones. The former is a wealthy M.R He has liberal views in theory, but he can go to any length to save his family’s reputation and his private property. He is not a socialist. He has a pampered son Jack studying at Oxford. Jack is given to drinking womanising and spending lavishly. He has no respect for anybody, not even for his father. He has no moral scruples. Mrs. Barthwick harps on the respectability of the family the innocence of her son and supposed evil designs of the lower classes.

Jones represents the have-nots the poor working class. His family consists of his wife and three children. He is out-of-work. He is willing to work but is unable to get work. Mrs. Jones works as a charwoman in the house of Barthwick where she is accused of stealing the silver box. There is a lot of similarity between Jack and Jones. Both are reckless in their conduct. Both drink too much and both run after other woman. Both are guilty of robbing or stealing. Jack snatches away the purse of a prostitute. Jones steals away that silk purse along with a silver box. both are characterless.

If Barthwick shows concern for his own reputation. Jones become violent to protect the honour and goodname of his respectable wife. He frees her from the false charge of theft. Barthwick is a bogus liberal, a hypocrite. He doesn’t hesitate to destroy a weak family. His son Jack tells lies and robs a woman of her purse.

Mrs. Jones on the other hand is very honest, sincere and submissive. Thus Jone’s family is in a way better than Barthwicks family. But at the same time both the families suffer in a similar manner due to the drunkard protagonists of them. Hence, it is apt to say the “Drinking affects the high and the low alike”. It prompts them to acquire similar vices, irrespective of their social and financial status.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 21 The Silver Box

Question 7.
What short coining of the British judicial system emerge out of the play? (M.P. 2016, 18)
Answer:
‘The Silver Box’ as regarded by John Gals worthy a comedy, is actually a problem play. We can call it a social tragedy. There are two categories of people in the society. One is upper class. The other is of lower class.The victims are poor and unemployed Jones, his wife, MrsJones and their three children.

The victimiser in the case is not so much the wealthy liberal, Mr. Barthwick as law itself. John Galsworthy indicts the established institu¬tion of law courts which is held in highest esteem for its fairness. The real quality is that the scales of justice are tilted in favour of mean of position and wealth. The principle of equality before law in a paper tigger, a legal function.

Jack and Jones are equally wicked. Both are equally guilty of misconduct, moral degration and stealing. But law treats them differently. Jack is able to get the help of a lawyer and the policeman. His offence of stealing is ignored. While the poor Jones is silenced and sent to prison.

Question 8.
Write a summary of Act II of the Silver Box in your own words.
Answer:
The Silver Box written by John Galsworthy is a short play. It contains three acts. It is a comedy on social structure. The laws prevailing in the society are not alike for rich and poor. The play has two kinds of characters of high standard and low standard.

In the summary of Act II, Mrs. Seddon, the landlady of Jones house, comes to collect the rent. Jones takes out the crimson purse. He says he got it lying on the road. It contained more than seven pounds. He plans to go to Canada to change his luck. The silver box is found in the coat pocket of Jones by Mrs. Jones. She blames him for spoiling her reputation.

Mr. Jones says he has not stolen it but picked it up under the influence of liquor. At the same time Snow, a detective enters and puts his hand on the box and declares to arrest Mrs. Jones. Jones confesses that he has stolen the box. He is thus arrested along with his wife and are produced before the law.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Chapter – 1

Question 1.
Why was Swaminathan apprehensive of Mondays? Which sentence in the lesson suggests that it was a five day week in Swaminathan’s school? (M.P. 2010, Imp.)
Answer:
Swami hated Mondays for it meant activity, discipline and work. After the holiday he had enjoyed on Saturday and Sunday, Monday was unpleasant for him. As Swami sat on the table in his room he found that he had a lot of homework to do and only two hours for doing it. The sentence in the text that suggests that it was a five day week in Swaminathan’s “After a delicious freedom of Saturday and Sunday it was difficult to get into the Monday mood of work discipline.”

Question 2.
Write about the four persons who were Swami’s friends. (M.P. 2015, Imp.)
Answer:
Swami is a boy, ten years old. He is a student of Albert Mission School. First form (A). He is quite happy at school, despite the tyranny of the teachers, and also despite the fact that he is not a good student, and net at all interested in his studies. His happiness results from the fact that he has got four fast friends, who were Somu, Mani, Shankar and Samuel, the Pea. Later on he gets another friend, Rajam.

In the company of these friends he cuts jokes, plays pranks and also sometimes, is engaged in friendly quarrels. With Mani and Rajam his relations are personal and human; these three (Swami, Mani and Rajam) constitute a sort of an inner circle. Swami’s relations with the other three – Somu, Shanker and the Pea are scholastic and impersonal.

Question 3.
Describe Mani’s personality. (M.P. 2009, 10, Imp.)
Answer:
Mani is one of the closest friends of Swami. He is known as “The mighty good for nothing”. He towers head and shoulders above the other boys of the class, and is friend and admired by all. He is a sort of bully, and says that his strength lies in the two clubs he has at home. He can easily break the neck of those with it who offend him. Swaminathan was proud of his friendship. While others crouched in awe, he could address him as ‘Mani’ with gusto and pat him in the back familiarly.

Question 4.
What were the similarities between Swaminathan and Samuel, the Pea? (M.P. 2009, 18, Imp.)
Answer:
Swami’s another bosom friend was Samuel, the Pea. He was called the Pea as he was very small in size. There is nothing uncommon about him, for he is neither a good student nor physically remarkable. The only thing common between them was laughter. They were able to see together the same absurdities and incongruities in things. The most trivial and unnoticeable things to others would tickle them to death.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

Chapter – 2

Question 5.
Who was Rajam? Why was Mani angry with him? (M.P. 2010, 12, 14, 16, 18)
Answer:
Rajam was a new student. He was the son of the Superintendent of Police. Swami admired Rajam and was much impressed by his carefree conduct and manners, and by his brilliance as a student. Even on the very first day, Rajam had much to impress him by his non-chalance, he dressed very well. He was the only boy in the class who wore socks and shoes, fur cap and tie, and a wonderful coat and knickers.

He came to the school in a car. He was a very good student too. It was said that he had come from some English boys school somewhere in Madras. He spoke very good English, exactly like a “European”. In his manner to Mani, he assumed a certain non-chalance to which Mani was not accustomed. If Mani was the overlord of the class, Rajam seemed to be nothing less. And add to all this the fact that Rajam was a regular seventy-percenter, second only to Shankar.

These were sure indications that Rajam was going to be the new power in the class. Day by day as Mani looked on, it was becoming increasingly clear that a new menace had appeared in his life. So Mani was jealous of Rajam.

Question 6.
What did Mani decide to do with Rajam? (M.P. 2014, 17)
Answer:
Mani wanted to bundle him into the river or to crack his shoulders with his club.

Question 7.
How did Swaminathan react when Mani told him about his intention? (M.P. 2009, Imp.)
Answer:
When Swami came to know about Mani’s plan he warned him to be careful for his father was the Superintendent of Police, and the police are an aw fill lot. But Mani did not care for all this and was determined to put the vile upstart down.

Question 8.
How did Mani and Rajam, instead of fighting, become friends? (M.P. 2010, Imp.)
Answer:
It was at last agreed that Mani and Rajam would meet on the banks of the river near Nallappa’s Grove. Accordingly, Mani came to the place with his clubs, and Rajam came there with his air gun. When Mani pointed out that he should not have brought the gun as it was to be a hand-to-hand fight, Rajam pointed out that he ought not to have brought his clubs.

Both the air gun and the clubs were then dispensed with, the Complaints which they had against each other were re-counted and hotly denied.The upshot was that the two suddenly decided to be friends, quite against the expectations. This conclusion was much to the relief of Swami, for he admired Rajam and wanted to be friends with him.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

Question 9.
Mani and Swaminathan wanted to play a prank on Rajam. Describe how the prank turned upon them? (M.P. 2016)
Answer:
Mani and Swami wanted to play a prank on Rajam and later was exposed as he was not annoyed. He knew what they had done was out of jealousy and enmity among themselves. He did not mind their dirty trick, instead he praised their performance as the kitten and puppy.

Chapter – 3

Question 10.
Where did Swaminathan’s grandmother live? What were her belongings? (M.P. 2014, Imp.)
Answer:
Swaminathan’s grandmother lived in a room which was ill-ventilated passage between the front hall and dining room. Here she lived with all her belongings. Her bed was made of, “five carpets, three bed sheets, and five pillows, a square box made of jute fibre, and a smgUAvooden box containing copper coins, cardamoms, cloves and areca nut”.

Question 11.
What did Swaminathan tell his grandmother about Rajam? (M.P. 2013, 17, Imp.)
Answer:
Swami told his grandmother that Rajam was a brilliant boy. He was the son of the Superintendent of police. He used to secure 90% of marks.

Question 12.
What did grandmother tell Swaminathan about his grandfather? What did grandmother do with grandfather’s medal?
Answer:
The grandmother was a garrulous lady and liked to talk about events in the distant past. When Swami told her about Rajam she began telling him about his grandfather. She told that his grandfather was a powerful magistrate and the police trembled before him and dacoits ran away is fear. He got 200 marks in the subject and got gold medal.

Question 13.
Describe in your own words the story of Rajam’s bravery as told by Swaminathan to his grandmother.
Answer:
Swami narrated a story of Rajam’s bravery. He told that once when Rajam’s father was camping in a forest Rajam was also with him. Two tigers came upon them suddenly one knocking down the father from behind and other chasing down Rajam. Rajam took shelter behind a bush and shot it dead with his gun.

Question 14.
What was Swaminathan waiting for while his father was preparing to go out? What did Swaminathan do in the meanwhile?
Answer:
One Saturday afternoon Swami was eager to go off to his friends, and impatiently waited for the departure of his father for his office. He pretended to read but in reality watched closely every detail of his father’s preparation to go to his office. He watched him as he tied his turban, took his watch, his snuffbox, his handkerchief and his umbrella.

He went out but was called in by the mother to the great annoyance of Swami, who had almost stood up to go out. She wanted some money, and the father returned to give it to her, and then went out a second time.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

Question 15.
How did Rajam entertain his friends at his house? (M.P. 2009, 16)
Answer:
Swami and Mani together went to Rajam. They were much amazed to see the large room of Rajam with his books arranged neatly on a big table, with a time-piece. Rajam kept them waiting for a few minutes and then came to them. He showed them his almirah full of toys. They beheld astounding things in it, miniature trains and motors, mechanical marvels, and a magic lantern with slides, a good, many large picture books and a hundred other things.

What interested Mani most was a grim air gun that stood in a comer. Rajam gave them permission to handle anything they pleased. In a short while Swaminathan was running an engine all over the room, Mani was shooting arrow after arrow from a bow, at the opposite wall. When he was tired of it, he took up the air gun devastated the furniture around with lead balls.

Question 16.
Do you approve of Rajam’s behaviour with the cook? Give reasons in support of your answer. (M.P. 2009)
Answer:
No, we do not approve of Rajam’s behaviour with the cook. At Rajam’s house coffee with some snacks was brought for Mani and Swami by the cook. Rajam tried to snub him in order to impress his friends with the power and authority he had. But the cook was more than a match for him. First he tried to argue with Rajam, and then walked off with the snacks telling him to come to the kitchen if he wanted the eatables. He had to go to the kitchen and bring in the snacks and the coffee himself. In order to hide his humiliation, he told his friends that he kicked the cooks for his impertinence and at that time he was lying unconscious in the kitchen.

Chapter – 4

Question 17.
How did Swaminathan know that the boys of his class called him tail? (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
Swami was surprised at the behaviour of his friends. He asked for his place in game. Nobody paid attention to him. His friends were talking amongst themselves. Again and again they were referring the word ‘tail’ like what is a tail, whether there was anyone like a tail etc.

When they said that there was someone present there who was a tail. Swaminathan could comprehend very little expect that remark contained some unpleasant references to himself. He became very hot and wanted to cry, then he asked about that remark and got confirmed that they were calling him tail of Rajam.

Question 18.
Whom did Swami suspect for writing ‘Tail’ on the blackboard? What did he do then? (M.P. 2014,18)
Answer:
Swami entered the classroom one day and a giggle went along the benches. Somebody had written ‘tail’ on the blackboard in huge letters. Swami suspected that the Pea and Shankar had done it. So he slapped them on the face. Pandemonium broke out in the class with Shankar, Pea and Swami rolling over and tearing clothes. The fight stopped with the entry of the teacher.

II. Answer the following questions in about 150 words each:

Chapter – 1

Question 1.
Describe how Swaminathan passed Monday in his school? (M.P. 2014, 16)
Answer:
Swami is a student of the first form (Section A). It is Monday morning and Swami hates Mondays, for it means activity, discipline and work, after the holiday he has enjoyed on Saturday and Sunday. As Swami sits on the table in his ‘room’ he finds that he has a lot of home work to do, and only two hours for doing it. He feels bored and tired, and is in no mood for work.

He reaches the class in time, and we are introduced to the fire-eyed Vedanayagan, the class-teacher and also arithmetic teacher. Swami does not like him and criticizes him that his face was that his eyes were too near each other, that there was more hair on his chin than one saw from the bench, and that he was very-very bad-looking. All the sums of Swami are wrong, they are crossed out, the remark ‘very bad’ is given and he is very severely pinched over his left ear, and told to go back to his seat.

Then comes the history period, and the teacher is Dr. Pillai. His method of teaching is interesting, but it does not conform to any known principles of education. It is followed by the scripture period and the teacher, Ebenezar, is a fanatic Christian. He constantly criticises and abuses Hindu Gods who, for him, are merely so many pieces of stone. When Swami puts a question, his ear is severely pulled and pinched.

Swami complains to his father, who writes a long letter to the Headmaster asking him to take action against the teacher, otherwise Hindu boys will be withdrawn from the school and the matter will be referred to higher authorities. But nothing comes out of it, except the reprimand to Swami from the Headmas¬ter who is there to take care of the boys. He tells Swami, “you must come to me if you want any help, before you go to your father.” Swaminathan furtively glances at Ebenezar, who has writhed in his chair.

“I am sorry”, said the headmaster, “that you should have been so foolish as to go to your father about this simple matter. I shall look into it. Take this letter of your father.“ Thus things remain where they were.

Chanter – 2

Question 2.
What were the reasons of animosity between Mani and Rajam? (Imp.)
Answer:
Rajam was a new student to the class of Swaminathan. He was a son of the Superintendent of police. He had been transferred from an English school of Madras. He was well dressed and well mannered. He was wear shoes and socks and tie. He came in a car. He was well built and knew all tacts.

On his first day at school he walked up to the last bench and sat beside Mani and felt comfortable till Mani gave him a job in the ribs which he returned. He had impressed the whole class on the very first day. He could speak English fluently. No other student in the class was able to compete with him in any way. By that time Mani was the boss as there was no one to challenge his strength. Rajam became a rival of Mani.

In his manner to Mani he assumed a certain non-chalance to which Mani was not accustomed. If Mani jabbed, Rajam jabbed; if Mani clouted, he clouted; if Mani kicked, he kicked. If Mani was overlord of the class, Rajam seemed nothing less. More than that Rajam was a brilliant student which Mani was not. So Rajam was now the new centre of power which was not acceptable to Mani. There were the remains of animosity between them.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

Question 3.
Despite their friendship, Swaminathan was afraid of Mani. What incident in the chapter shows this? (Imp.)
Answer:
Mani and Swaminathan were good friends. Swami had respect for Mani. Mani was the hero for he was well built and able to do anything which was beyond imagination for many. He could break neck of anyone with his clubs. Swami was proud of his friendship with him. While other crunched in awe,he could address him as ‘Mani’ with gusto and pat him on the back familiarly. Swami turns angry with him when he begins rivalry with Rajam.

Swami likes Rajam very much for his qualities. Mani doesn’t like Rajam because he appears to be a challenge to him. Mani decides to bundle Rajam into the river or to crack his shoulders with his club. Swami worns him to be careful for his father is the Superintendent of police. When Mani doesn’t show reluctance Swami cries in protestation which makes Mani surprised. This incident shows that he was also afraid of Mani.

Chapter – 3

Question 4.
“Swaminathan had good rapport with his grandmother.” Do you agree with this statement? Give instances in support of your answer.
Answer:
Swami had good rapport with his grandmother. Swami used to feel very snug and safe in the faint atmosphere of cardamon and cloves. After the night meal, with his head on his granny’s lap he nestled close to her. Some of the instances of his rapport with granny is seen when he talks with her. Let us see how he talks:

“Oh, Granny: he cried ecstatically.” You don’t know what a great fellow Rajam is.” He told her the story of the first enmity between Rajam and Mani and the subsequent friendship.

“You know he has a real police dress.” Said Swaminathan,
‘Is it? What does he want a police dress for?’ asked Granny,

The grandmother is rather garrulous and likes to talk at length about wants in the distant past, the memories of which crowd in upon her and make her discourse at length, when Swami tells her about Rajam she herself begins to talk incoherently about her own part. Her narration is often inaccurate and confused and rambling. Still Swami enjoys it.

Question 5.
Swaminathan was waiting impatiently for his father to go out, but his exit was taking too long. Describe how his father took so long to leave the house? (Imp.)
Answer:
One Saturday afternoon Swami had a plan to visit Rajam’s house. So he was waiting impatiently for his father’s departure. But his father was taking time for preparing himself. He stood before mirror, winding a turban round his head. He had put on his silk coat. Swami was watching him keenly. Now only his spectacles remained and then the watch.

Swami felt gland that it was the cast item and after that his father would leave for the court. But then his mother came with a tumbler of water in one hand and a plate of betel leaves and nuts in the other father drank water and held out his hard. Mother gave him a little areca nut and half a dozen neatly rolled betel leaves. He put them all into his mouth, chewing them with great contentment.

Swami read at the top of his voice the poem about a woolly sheep. His father about a little for his tiny silver snuffbox and took his handkerchief. He hooked his umbrella which was the signal for starting. Swami had almost closed the book and risen. In the meantime mother stopped his father. He again came back. He opened his bureau, gave money to mother, adjusted his turban before mirror, took a heavy pinch of Snuff and wiping his nose with hanky went out. Now Swami was relieved.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

III. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Chapter -1

Question 1.
Why did Swaminathan go to the infant standards? What did he find children doing there? (Imp.)
Answer:
As the geography teacher was absent, the boys of the first A i.e., Swami’s class were in leisure. Swami missed his friend and he was alone. He wandered along the corridor of the infant standards. He saw the infants dabbling in wet clay and trying to shape models. For Swami it was ridiculous things to do in school.

Question 2.
Where did Swaminathan find Sankar, Somu and others? How did they behave with him? (M.P. 2017)
Answer:
Swaminathan found Shankar, Somu and other under a tamarind tree. This was secluded place in the school campus. They were playing some games. Swami joined them with a low, ecstatic cry. But they responded indifferently. It disappointed him. They turned their faces to him with a faint smile and returned to their game.

Question 3.
Describe Swaminathan’s state of mind when Sankar, Somu and others stopped talking to him. (M.P. 2011, Imp.)
Answer:
Swami was feeling restless when Shankar, Somu and others stopped talking to him. He was feeling lonely. His friends were also hostile to him. It was very painful for poor Swami, but he could not help it. He wanted to talk to them and crack jokes but, he was helpless. He was feeling uncomfortable.

Question 4.
How did grandmother react when Swaminathan told her about Rajam’s visit? What instructions did Swami give her?
Answer:
It was Saturday and Rajam was to visit Swami in the afternoon. Swami wanted to create a good impression on his friend who was a V.I.R, the son of a Superintendent of Police. He first cleaned his table and arranged his books properly. Then he told to his Granny that she was too old, and so she should not come in when Rajam was with him. He told her so quite frankly even though it must have been rather painful for her.

Question 5.
What provoked Swaminathan to slap the Pea? What followed thereafter? (M.P. 2016, Imp.)
Answer:
One day when Swami entered the class, a giggle went along the benches. Somebody had written ‘Tail’ on the blackboard in huge letters. Swami suspected that the Pea and Shankar had done it. So he slapped them on the face, pandemonium broke out in the class, with Shankar, Pea and Swami rolling over and over and tearing each others hair, faces and clothes. The fight stopped for a moment when the teacher entered. But a moment later they left the class, to fight it out in the fields adjoining the school.

Question 6.
Why did Mani take the boys out of the class to a secluded place? Why could he not succeed in bringing about a reconciliation? (M.P. 2017)
Answer:
Swami told his friends that Pea and Shankar wrote the ‘Tail’ on the blackboard, and that they called him “Rajam’s tail”. Somu sided with Shankar and Pea, and Mani stood up for Swami. In order to settle the matter Mani took the boy to a secluded place in order to bring about a reconciliation. A fierce fight between Main and Somu followed.

Mani swung his hand and brought it down on Somu’s nape. Sonu pushed it away with a heavy blow. Mani aimed a kick at Somu, which would send him rolling. Somu stepped aside and delivered one himself, which nearly bent the other. He could not succeed because they went on fighting with none to aim.

Chapter – 3

Question 7.
What prank did Mani and Swaminathan want to play on Rajam? (Imp.)
Answer:
Mani and Swami knocked at the door of Rajam’s room and as soon as he opened the door, they pretended to be a blind kitten and a blind and crawled into the room as such. As they had closed their eyes, they did not see that Somu, Shanker. and Pea were there. Indeed, they touched and fondled their feet and when they did open their eyes they saw that they had the feet of Somu, Shanker and the Pea.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

Question 8.
What made Mani to boil with rage? How did Rajam assuage his anger? (M.P. 2011, 13, 16)
Answer:
They were angry with Rajam, for they thought he had played a dirty trick on them. But Rajam soon pacified them by praising their performance as the kitten and the puppy. He then proceeded to give them a long lecture on the value of friendship, and the infinite torture to which those who harbour enmity are subjected to in hell. So vivid and eloquent was he, that the boys were terrified.

Question 9.
What impressive things did Rajam tell them about friendship? (Imp.)
Answer:
In the end, he offered them handsome gifts, if they would become friends and give up their hostility. The gifts were attractive, they were already terrified, and so they soon shook hands and left as very good friends.

Question 10.
What, according to the Vedas, was the punishment for those who foster enmity?
Answer:
Rajam gave an eloquent lecture on those who harbour jealousy and enmity with other. He cited instances and lines from the great religious book Vedas. He said that it is written there that a person who fostered enmity should be locked up in a small room after his death.

He would be made to stand, stark naked, on a pedestal of red hot iron. There were beehives all around with bees as big as lemons. If the sinner stepped down from the pedestal he would have to put his foot on immense scorpions and centipedes that crawled about the room in hundreds.

Question 11.
What made the boys end their enmity – Rajam’s lecture on friendship or the prizes he offered to each of them? Support your answer with arguments. (M.P. 2017)
Answer:
Rajam’s lecture on friendship put greater effect on each of the friends. They got afraid of the religious interference and they were not in mind to continue enmity and get punishment in the life hereafter. The gift offered by Rajam may have also put them in pressure.

Question 12.
What thoughts crossed Swaminathan’s mind when he gazed at the maps in the atlas? (M.P. 2016, 18)
Answer:
Swaminathan when sat with the atlas he wandered what the shape of the people might be who lived in places where the outline narrowed and how he managed to escape being strangled. He wondered if he would able to see India as it looked in the map, if he stood on the top of Town hall.

IV. Answer the following questions in about 150 words each:

Chapter – 1

Question 1.
What preparations did Swaminathan make for Rajam’s visit to his house? (M.P. 2014)
Answer:
On a Saturday afternoon Rajam had promised to visit Swami’s house. He was very much excited. As he had already visited Rajam’s house, he did not want to show himself inferior to Rajam in any way. First he was confused about the room where he would entertain his friend. He selected his father’s room. He cleansed the table and arranged his books so neatly that his father was surprised. Then he instructed his mother to prepare something nice and sweet.

He suggested not to make usual coffee but very good and hot. He asked his mother to serve the coffee and tiffin as he had seen Rajam’s cook serving them. He asked his cook to wear a clean, white dhoti and shirt. Then he asked mother to ask father to allow him to use his room for Rajam’s visit father agreed. Then he asked his granny to change her dhoti and not to interrupt between them.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

Question 2.
Narrate the incident in the class which ultimately led to the fight between Mani and Somu.
Answer:
On the Monday morning after Saturday’s visit to Rajam’s house, Swami come to school. But it was not at all pleasant for him. Someone has written the word ‘tail’ on the blackboard in huge letters. Swami suspected that the Pea and Shankar had done it. So he slapped them on the face. There was a silence in the class. Swami, Shankar and Pea were rolling over and over and tearing each others, hair faces and clothes. The fight stopped for a while when the teacher entered the class. But a moment letter they left the class to fight.

V. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Chapter -1

Question 1.
Why was Swaminathan cold and reserve to his mother when he was taken to her room? (Imp.)
Answer:
Swamiriathan’s mother was in labour pain. She had been bedridden for two days. Swami didn’t see her in kitchen. He felt uncomfortable in her absence. When he was taken to her room he found her lying disherited and pale on the bed. She called him closer to her. As Swami was not so mature he couldn’t understand what was going on. Therefore was cold and reserved when he came in the room.

Question 2.
How did Swaminathan describe his little brother to the Pea? (M.P. 2012, 14)
Answer:
Swami was confused at the birth of his new baby brother. When he came to school next day he told his friend Pea about it. For him the baby was funny. He said “Oh like him. He is hardly anything. Such a funny looking creature. Further he said “this thing was wonderful pair of hands. So small and plump, you know! But I tell you, his face is awful, red, red like milk.

Chapter – 2

Question 3.
What change did swaminathan observe in his father’s behaviour toward him before the examination?
Answer:
It was the month of April, just two weeks before the annual exams. Swami’s father, quite naturally, now wanted that his son should devote more time to his studies and often rebuked him when he saw the boy wasting his time. Swami thought he was changing and growing more fussy and difficult every day.

However, his words had some effect on him when he warned him that, if he failed, his juniors would become his classmates, and his friends would become his seniors, and would no longer like to mix up with him.

Question 4.
What changes did Swaminathan find in his friends behaviour before the examination? (M.P. 2013)
Answer:
At school also everybody seemed “to be overwhelmed by the thought of the examination”. His friends hardly exchanged even a few words with him, they were busy with their preparations.

Question 5.
What hints did the school clerk give to Mani? Was Mani satisfied with them?
Answer:
The boys were under the impression that the school clerk knew all about the question papers and he could help them a lot. So one day, Mani visited him with a gift of brinjals. The clerk was pleased, welcomed Mani, and talked a great deal about various matters. When he did not come to the point, Mani asked him bluntly to tell him a few important questions.

The clerk did not refuse but told him vaguely that it is good to prepare maps, to solve five problems every day for Maths, and as regards English, there is nothing to worry about it he has read all the lessons.

Question 6.
Do you agree to what Mani did to succeed in the examination? Give reasons in support of your answer. (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
I think what Mani did to know the questions from the school clerk was not good. When he know that the clerk had the idea about the questions he went to meet him. He took a gift to impress him. Though the clerk did not say anything clearly, Mani thought it right and prepared accordingly. It is not good for a good student. It is unjustified.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

Question 7.
Why did Swaminathan find his brother more interesting as he grew up?
Answer:
In the beginning Swami was skeptical of his brother but as he grew he become more interesting for him. He was six months old now and was charming. He made shrill noises wherever he saw anybody, thrust his fist into his mouth, damped his round arms up to the elbow and vigorously kicked the air. He also displayed his base red gum in a smile. Swami loved each of his activities. Swami was feeling more attached with him.

Question 8.
Waht did Swaminathan’s father do when he saw the list?
Answer:
After preparing the list of the items for his examination when Swami approached his father. Father became angry. He said that there is no need to buy anything as everything was available there. His father said that he neither had any clip nor Swami need them. He asked what was the use of pad when there were benches in school. Then he said that he didn’t need anything. They were useless. Swami felt bad at such response from his father.

Chapter – 3

Question 9.
What were Swaminathan’s friends doing when he left the examination hall?
Answer:
Examinations were going on in school. Swaminathan came out of the examination room. But he found none of his friends had come out. They were still in the examination room. Shankar was lost to the world with his left shoulder against the wall. Rajam had become a writing machine while Mani was still gazing at the rafters scratching his chin with the pen. The Pea was leaning back in his seat revising his answers.

Question 10.
How did Swaminathan solve the question paper?
Answer:
Swami came out of the exam hall twenty minutes before the time. Out of six question set he had answered the first question to his satisfaction. The second was doubtful, the third was satisfaction, the fourth was clearly wrong. But the sixth answer was the best of all. It took only a minute to answer it.

Question 11.
Which two morals did Swaminathan draw from the story in the question paper? Which of them did he write in the answer book and why? (Imp.)
Answer:
There was a story given in the sixth question. The question was to give the moral of the story. Swami had never thought that this story contained a moral. But later he thought it must have one as the question said. Then it took a minute to decide whether the moral was: “we must never accept a gold bangle when it is offered by a tiger” or “Love of gold bangle costs one’s life”. He saw more logic in the latter and wrote it down.

Question 12.
Why did Swaminathan lie about the length of the answer of the last question about moral of the story?
Answer:
When the friends of Swami came out of the examination room they began discussing how they answered the question. At the question of moral of the story one of them had written a full page, Rajam had written only three quarter of a page. While Shankar had written a little more than half. As Swami had written only a line he felt disclosing it would be befooling himself, so he said he also wrote about half a page.

Question 13.
What did the Headmaster ask the student to do during the vacation?
Answer:
The headmaster came and announced the closure of school for the vacation. He hoped that the boys would not waste their time but read story books and keeps glancing through the books prescribed for their next classes.

Question 14.
What mischief did the boys play while returning home? Why did they do it?
Answer:
After the headmaster’s speech the assembly was dispersed. Boys began making mischief out of jubilation for the vacation. Ink bottles were broken and ink was poured over one another’s head and clothes. Mani was the leader of the jubilant team of the boys. All the stationery items here destroyed.

Question 15.
Why did Singaram, the peon rush into the crowd of boys with a stick?
Answer:
In the midst of merry making the boys broke more bottles of ink on the ground. Mani cried to bring the turban of Singaram the school peon to dye in the ink. As Singaram was the only man to oppose such liberty of the boys he became a target of the boys. But as Singaram heard something about himself he became infuriated and he rushed into the crowd dispersed the revellers.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

Question 16.
name all the characters of the Novel. In your view who is the best one out of all of them?
Answer:
The characters of the Novel ‘Swami and Friends’ are: (a) Swami, (b) Mani, (c) Rajam, (d) Pea, (e) Samuel, (f) Somu and (g) Shankar.

Swaminathan: Swaminathan is the hero of the novel though he is unheroic in his deeds, yet, the whole story is centred around him. Swaminathan is just an ordinary boy with no outstanding intellect. He was a student of First Form (A). He is not a good student and every Monday is unpleasant for him.

After the freedom of Saturday and Sunday it is difficult for him to get into the Monday mood of work and discipline. At school he is rebuked by his teachers for his unsatisfactory work and at home his father keeps a watch on him that he does not loaf around in afternoon on weekends.

School is a bad place for him although he feels happy in the company of his friends, particularly, Rajam and Mani. He admires Rajam, the son of Police Superintendent, and likes his company. He was seen with him so much that his other friends started calling him ‘Tail’ of Rajam.

Swami himself is weak and nervous about things and therefore feels protected in the company of Rajam and Mani who are stronger than him. For him, they are heroes and he follows them. Mani is his good friend yet he is afraid of him. At home, he has a good rapport with his Granny. She is his friend at home. He shares with her everything that occurs in his life.

He is not so close to his mother as to his granny. He sleeps at night listening stories from her and gets emotional support from her. He is afraid of his father and waits impatiently for his departure from home on weekends as he has to go out to meet his friends.

He is not good at studies and is very bad in arithmetic. He is everytime rebuked by his father for studies before his examinations. Though he is not a good student yet, he does not think about using unfair means to pass in examination like his friend Mani. He does not think about going to the school clerk’s house to know the important questions for exams. He is therefore, honest.

Question 17.
Who was the cord or communication between Mani and Rajan? (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
There was animosity between Mani and Rajam. They were sitting on the back bench in the classroom. Swaminathan acted as a cord of communication sitting between them, with an exchange of message in writing. He was like a link between them.

Question 18.
Who challenged Mani’s authority? (M.P. 2015, 18)
Answer:
Somu challenged Mani’s authority. The fighting was violent. They both roled over the ground to beat each other which frightened the other boys of the class. The headmaster ended the fight.

Question 19.
How did Swaminathan prepare the list of things he wanted for the examination?
Answer:
The examination of Swaminathan were very near. Two days before starting the examination, he prepared a list of things that he needed for the examination. He wrote un-rolled paper – 20 sheets, Nibs – 6, Ink – 2 bottles, clips and pins. He nibbled his pencil and re-read the list. It was not good. He thought that it was short. Then he scrutinized it and made another one monitoring:

  • Unruled paper – 20 sheets
  • Ruled white paper – 10 sheets
  • Black ink – 01 bottle
  • Clips – 3-6-12
  • Pins – 6-12

The list was not satisfactory even then. He pondered over it and added cardboard pad – 01 and one rupee for additional expenses.

VI. Answer the following questions in about 150 words each:

Chapter – 1

Question 1.
Describe in your own words the activities that took place in Swaminathan’s house on the night when his new brother arrived. (Imp.)
Answer:
Swami’s mother was to give birth to a baby. One day his Granny said to him that he was going to have a baby brother. That night he was allowed to sleep on Granny’s bed. The lights kept burning all night. Whenever he opened his eyes he was conscious of busy feet scurrying along the passage. Late at night when he woke up he saw a lady doctor in the hall. She behaved as if the house belonged to her. She entered mother’s room.

A mingled noise was coming out of that room. Then she came out and commanded Swami’s father to do something. He went away and returned with a small bottle in his hand. He hovered about uncertainly. The hushed voices, hurry, seriousness, agitation, hot water, and medicine preparations for ushering on new person were all beyond comprehension of Swami.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 20 Swami and Friends

Chapter – 2

Question 2.
Why did Mani go to the school clerk’s house? Do you approve of his behaviour? Give arguments in support of your answer. (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
As the examination was coming nearer the students were becoming more worried. They were totally confused but overwhelmed. In the meantime a rumour spread that the school clerk had the secret idea about the question paper. Mani was more concerned about it. So one day he took a meat bundle of fresh brinjals and reached the clerk’s house and laid the bundle at his feet.

The clerk was pleased. The clerk was a clever fellow. He talked all about cat and other things but he was not coming to the point of examination. Finally, Mani’s patience broke down and he directly asked him about the question paper. The clerk replied vaguely about all the subjects. However Mani was satisfied.

He came back and began preparing in that direction, what Mani did was absolutely improper and ill-ways for a sincere student. No one will call him a read student. A student duty is to read labour honestly. Mani never paid attention to his study but wanted to know the question using unfair means. I condemn such a boy.

Question 3.
How did Rajam bring about reconciliation between his fighting friends? (M.P. 2011, Imp.)
Answer:
Rajam was a tactful boy. He belonged to a high society. He was a brilliant student. He always wanted to be cordial and friendly with everyone so when Swami and Mani wanted to play pranks on him and later was exposed he was not annoyed. He knew what they had done was out of jealousy and enmity among themselves.

So, he tried to give an elaborate and effective lecture to time explaining what friendship was and how enmity can spot their life. He did not mind their dirty trick. Instead he praised their performance as the kitten and puppy. Then he preached them on the value of friendship and said that those who harbour enmity are subjected hell. They are tortured. Later they all realised their faults. Then Rajam offered them gifts. Thus Rajam enough reconciliation between his friends.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 19 The Gita and Swadharma

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 19 The Gita and Swadharma

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
What does Vinoba Bhave say about his heart and mind?
Answer:
Vinoba says that the Gita seeks to remove the delusion that distracts him from his duty.

Question 2.
Where does he soar high and how?
Answer:
He soars high in the vast expanse of the Gita on the twin wings of faith and experimentation.

Question 3.
What does Vinoba Bhave compare the Gita with?
Answer:
Vinoba Bhave compares the Gita with the Ocean of nectar.

Question 4.
Where has the Gita been set?
Answer:
The Gita has been set in the Mahabharata.

Question 5.
What does it look like?
Answer:
It looks like a lighthouse.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 19 The Gita and Swadharma

II. Answer the following questions in about 40 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
In the opinion of many people what was the purpose of preaching Gita?
Answer:
In the opinion of many people the purpose of preaching the Gita was to restore Aijuna’s manliness and persuade him to fight. In their view the Gita preaches not only Karmayoga (the philosophy of action) but also Yudhayoga (the philosophy of war).

Question 2.
What in the opinion of Vinoba, is inconceivable?
Answer:
In the opinion of Vinoba, it is inconceivable to doubt Arjuna’s manliness and valour. The army is not braver than him. It is not out of fear that he is turning away from the battle. He is a great warrior. He had fought hundreds of battles and valour is in every drop of his blood.

Question 3.
Whom had Arjuna single handedly routed and when?
Answer:
Arjuna was a great warrior. He had fought hundreds of battles. He had single handedly routed Bhishma, Drona and Kama when they had invaded Virat’s Kingdom.

Question 4.
Why had war become inevitable?
Answer:
Every attempt to avoid war had failed. The Pandava’s had pitched their claims at the minimum. Still the kaurava’s didn’t agree. Even Krishna himself had tried to meditate in order to burry the chance of war. But all the attempts proved in vain, making th e war inevitable.

Question 5.
Why did Arjuna ask Krishna to place his chariot between two armies?
Answer:
Arjuna had come to the battlefield to fight war. Krishna was his charioteer. But before starting the war, he asked Krishna to place his chariot between the two armies because he wanted to have a look at the people who had assembled there to fight with him.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 19 The Gita and Swadharma

Question 6.
What did he see then?
Answer:
When Krishna placed his chariot between the two armies, Arjuna looked around and saw his kith and kin, near and dear ones arrayed on both the sides. He found four generations of his own people intent on fighting to the finish.

Question 7.
What made Arjuna lose his nerve? (M.P. 2018)
Answer:
Arjuna saw his kith and kin, near and dear ones arrayed on both the sides in the battlefield. This made him lose his nerve. He found it difficult to fight with his own people.

Question 8.
What Lord Krishna realize?
Answer:
Arjuna felt attached with his Kinsmen. This attachment to the kith and kin clouded his sense of duty. He began to curse war. Krishna realized that Arjuna was not voicing his own authentic conviction, his words were seemingly wise, but not really so.

Question 9.
Where does the Gita nowhere deal with and why?
Answer:
The Gita nowhere deals with the opinion that Arjuna had really become a votary of non-violence. Had he really become so, he would not have been satisfied until his arguments has been convincingly answered.

Question 10.
What then is the purpose of the Gita?
Answer:
The purpose of the Gita is to remove the delusion that stands between us and our Swadharma. Arjuna was confused about his dharma. He was gripped by a delusion about his Swadharma. When criticizes him, he himself admits it. The Gita’s main task is to remove that delusion, that attachment.

III. Answer the following questions in about 75 words each:

Question 1.
What is the second common opinion about the Gita, which according to Vinoba Bhave is not right?
Answer:
The second common opinion is that the Gita is meant to make Arjuna willing to fight by removing his inclination towards non-violence. But Vinoba Bhave rejects this opinion by giving appropriate example. If Arjuna had really become a worshipper of non-violence, he would not have come to the battlefield but the fact was that he had come to the battlefield with a firm resolve and a sense of duty.

He was a Kshatriya and fighting was in his blood. He had slain innumerable warriors in many battles. War was for him his natural and inescapable duty. But he was trying to evade it under the spell of delusion, i.e., attachment of his Kinsmen.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 19 The Gita and Swadharma

Question 2.
What clouded his sense of duty and made him philosophies?
Answer:
Arjuna had come to the battlefield with a firm resolve and a sense of duty. He was a Kshatriya and fighting was in his blood. But when he looked around the battlefield, he found his kith and kin, near and dear ones arrayed on both sides. It was not that Arjuna had no Idea of what he was going to see. But the actual sight shook him from within the heart.

He felt attached to his close friends and relatives. Had there infront of him not been his Kinsmen he would even now have felt no qualms in severing their heads. But attachment to the kith and kin clouded his sense of duty and then he started philosophising.

Question 3.
What specious argument did Arjuna put before Lord Krishna?
Answer:
It was attachment with his kith and kin, near and dear ones that clouded his sense of duty. He suddenly began to evade war under the spell of delusion i.e., attachment to his friends and relatives. He philosophised so that war might not occur. He put before Krishna the specious argument that war in itself was sinful that it would destroy the clan, eclipse dharma and bring total destruction.

Question 4.
What proved that Arjuna had not become a votary of non-violence?
Answer:
Arjuna had not really become a votary of non-violence. Being a Kshatriya, fighting was in his blood. The intrinsic tendency to fight was still very much a part of his nature. War was for him his natural and inescapable duty. He had slain innumerable warriors in many a battle. But he was trying to evade war under the spell of delusion i.e., attachment of his close friends and relatives.

IV. Answer the following questions in about 150 words each:

Question 1.
What story of a judge does Vinoba Bhave narrate, and why?
Answer:
Vinoba Bhave narrates the story of a judge. He had awarded death sentence to hundreds of criminals. But one day his own son accused of murder, was produced before him. The guilt was proved and the time came for the judge to pronounce the sentence. But then he hesitated and started arguing that the death sentence is in human. It is not good to inflict such a punishment. It destroys all hopes of reforming the guilty.

One commits murder in a fit of passion. The moment of blood thirsty madness then passes off. Still we take him to the gallows and hang him to death. It is really a blot on humanity. But had his son not been there the Judge would have gone sentencing people to death.

This makes it clear that the judge’s arguments were born out of attachment to his son. Vinoba Bhave narrates the above story because he finds Aijuna’s condition like that of the judge. Arjuna tried to evade war because he didn’t want to fight with his own people.

Had these infront of him not been his Kinsmen he would certainly have felt no qualms in severing their heads and merrily tossing them around. The arguments that he put before Krishna looked inner conviction, like that of a judge. They were all born out of attachment to his own people.

Question 2.
What does Vyasa say at the beginning of the Mahabharata and does the Gita succeed in achieving that purpose?
Answer:
Vyasa at the beginning of the Mahabharata says that he is lighting this lamp of history to dispel delusions from the minds of the people. The Gita succeeds in achieving its purpose which centres around the removal of delusion that stands between us and our swadharma. When Krishna criticizes him severely, he himself admits it.

The main task of the Gita is to remove that delusion i.e., Arjuna’s attachment to his kith and kin. When Lord Krishna asked Arjuna at the end of the Gita if his delusion had gone then, Arjuna replied in affirmative. He said that the delusion had fled away, and he had realized what swadharma is.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 18 The Abominable Snowman

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 18 The Abominable Snowman

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
What analogy has the author used for proving the existence of the Snowman? (M.P. 2014, Imp., 16)
Answer:
In this article the author makes an effort to unfold the mystery of the Abominable Snowman who has long been undiscovered with authenticity. He takes the footprints as evidence of the existence of Snowman. The analogy that he takes to prove it is that if fingerprints can decide the hanging of a man why footprints can not establish the existence of one.

Question 2.
Why did the author want to start his inquiry with Mount Everest?
Answer:
The author wants to start his inquiry with Mount Everest because it is still untrodden and has been mysterious for long strange things that happen there.

Question 3.
More evidence was provided by two persons about the existence of the Snowman in 1936. What was it and who were they?
Answer:
In 1936 one Mr. Ronald Kaulback travelled in the Upper Salween and reported having seen at 16,000 feet five sets of tracks taking exactly as though made by a barefooted man. He added that there were no bears. More evidence was tendered by wing commander Beauman who reported similar tracks from the Central Himalayas.

Question 4.
How did Mr. Kaulback react when people suggested that the footprints could be those of the Giant Panda or Snow Bear?
Answer:
When Mr. Kaulback said that the tracks which he saw were exactly made by biped, he was contradicted with the view that they were made by Giant panda or Snow Bear. At this he reacted hat he was ashamed that he had not thought of it himself. But he had not heard of Pandas in those parts nor were there bamboo shots.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 18 The Abominable Snowman

Question 5.
How did Mr. Tombazi happen to see the Snowman? (Imp.)
Answer:
Mr. Tombazi writes that “an intense glare prevented him seeing anything for the first few seconds, but soon he spotted the object referred to, two or three yards away down the valley. They were exactly like human beings. They were not wearing any clothing.

Question 6.
What was Mr. Newman’s theory about the footprints? (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
Mr. Newman’s theory about the footprints was that they belonged to men who were either outlaws or ascetics striving to obtain magical powers by cutting themselves off from mankind.

II. Answer the following questions in about 75 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
How did Mr. Smythe strengthen his claim that the footprints were those of a ‘biped’? Why did he later retract his claim and say that the tracks were made by a bear?
Answer:
Mr. Smythe was an explorer in the Himalayas. He found the evidence of the footprints. They were huge, apparently of a biped. Photographs and measurements were taken. Then in order to clinch the thing he got the Sherpa’s signature on a written statement to the effect that the tracks were those of a Metch Kangami. They added that although they had never seen one, because anyone, who does, dies, or is killed, they had seen pictures of his tracks in Tibetan monasteries.

Later when Smythe submitted his evidences he retreated his claim and said that the tracks were made by a bear. He did so because he was not sure about the Sherpas who were frightened men and could withdraw any moment. More than that there was no way to measure and prove the tracks and print.

Question 2.
Describe H.W. Tilman’s sighting of tracks in Sikkim.
Answer:
The author H.W. Tilman had on open mind on the subject. In 1938 during the course of his exploration he was in Sikkim when he saw tracks. Along with two Sherpas he was crossing the Zemu Gap, a 19,000 foot pass between Kanchanjunga and Shimu. The weather was thick, the snow soft and they plodded up a long easy snow slope when they saw a single line of footsteps. In view of the prevailing weather it could not be many days old.

Question 3.
How did the author confirm that the tracks that he had observed were not made by human beings? (Imp.)
Answer:
The author was trying to get a conclusion about the identification of the track he had seen. When he reached Darjeeling he came to know that no party had gone on the mountains recently. The last visit was made by Brigadier John Hunt. But even Mr. Hunt had been there in November. So the author got confirmed that the tracks were not of the human beings.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 18 The Abominable Snowman

Question 4.
What reasons does the author ascribe to the round shape of the footprints?
Answer:
There is a discrepancy between the tracks seen by Hunt and the author himself and those of the two previous climbers. They were circular while those seen by the author and 1 lunt resembled those made by large boots. The author in order to confirm, used his senses and said that those were not necessarily of a brute beast, but an erect being who might have came down from his tree even earlier than they did. He thinks that even bears, bees, ants are not without constructive ability so we can without doubt attribute those tracks to the Snowman.

Question 5.
Describe in your own words the sight Mr. Tombazi witnessed when he was called from his tent by his porters?
Answer:
Mr. Tombazi, having been called from his tent, saw an intense glare which prevented his seeing for the first few seconds. But soon he could spot the object two or three hundred yards away down the valley. The figure, no doubt, in outline was exactly like a human being, walking upright and stopping occasionally to uproot some dwarf rhododendron.

It showed dark against the snow and wore no clothing. Within the next minute or so it had moved into some thick scrub and disappeared. He examined the footprints which were similar in shape to those of a man but only 6 or 7 inches longer.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 17 The Last Ride Together

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 17 The Last Ride Together

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
What thoughts pass through the lover’s mind when he and his beloved were riding together? (M.P. 2012, Imp.)
Answer:
The lover expresses the heavenly bliss which he experiences for a short while in the company of his beloved during the ride. The lady bent towards him and placed her head on his shoulder. Her body was in close contact with his own. The lover thinks that the world may end that very night and so the moment of his bliss may become eternal.

Question 2.
How does the speaker find his fulfilment in the present when he says. “I hoped she would love me; here we ride?”
Answer:
Here the lover, as he rode by the side of his beloved, mused on the sorry lot of humanity in this world. As he rode by the side of his beloved, he felt as if his spirit was soaring high. The entire landscape seemed to wear a different look. The fields through which they rode and the cities they came across seemed to him to be bathed in divine glory.

His own joy transfigured and illuminated the entire region which rushed passed them, on both sides, as they rode forward. The poet here puts his ideals that aspirations of man are never realised. But he at least has the consolation of riding with as beloved. Others are denied even this sort of consolation.

Question 3.
How does the statement “We know, what’s fit for us”, reveal the speaker’s faith in fate?
Answer:
Who knows, what’s fit for us, reveals the speaker’s faith in fate. None can say what may happen in future. All men make efforts in the world but some of them succeed and some of them fail. Success and failure go on with the man’s fate. At some time man becomes successful, at another time, the same man becomes unsuccessful.

There are some that succeed through life while there are others who fail throughout life. The poet, as a lover, expresses his views that success in life means failure to come in life success &failure appear after each other, as joys and woes follow each other in mans life.

Question 4.
Why does the speaker consider the earth a favoured place in comparison to heaven? (M.P. 2013,18)
Answer:
Heaven is nothing but the realisation of our highest hopes as aspirations. It is life at its best. Man has always looked upwards and thought that heaven lies somewhere over head. But for the lover if one enjoys the company of his beloved it is the earth which is heaven. It gives him heavenly bliss.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 17 The Last Ride Together

Question 5.
Explain the significance of the expression “this glorygarland round my soul” in reference to the ride.
Answer:
Man can’t get all his desires fulfilled. Had he reached his goal in this world and had gained the garland of victory by winning the love of his beloved he would have had nothing to look forward in the life to come. If he had achieved the heavenly happiness in this world, if he had won the love of his beloved here, no hopes of any reward in other world would have left for him.

Question 6.
How are the brave deeds of the soldier rewarded by the world? (M.P. 2014, Imp.)
Answer:
In the poem, ‘The Last Ride Together’ the poet has compared his achievement with that of a statesman, a soldier, a poet or a musician. In reference with the above lines in the question, the brave deeds of a soldier is rewarded by the world only with a burial in the Westminster Abbey, a place where only the great and heroic passengers are hurried and a flag is hoisted over his memorial.

Question 7.
How does the speaker compare his soul with a scroll?
Answer:
As his soul had grown wrinkled and disfigured with grief, so the poet compares it with a scroll.

Question 8.
What does the poet express in his verses?
Answer:
In his verses the poet expresses the view that sublime ideals and beautiful things are best and men should try to achieve them.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 17 The Last Ride Together

II. Answer the following questions in about 75 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
The speaker considers his fate better than that of others. Why and how? (Imp.)
Answer:
In this poem a lover reflects on human life. He realises that all in this world work hard to achieve their objectives. But all of them do not succeed. Man can hardly achieve his ambitions. Despite lifelong toil man can achieve very little. Actual achievement is small in comparison with much that remains undone. Aspirations of man are never realized to the fullest.

In this poem the lover aspires for his beloved’s love but fails. Still he thinks himself to be a little better in the sense that he gets a chance to enjoy his last ride together with his beloved. He experiences a heavenly bliss in her company. Others are denied, even such momentary bliss.

Question 2.
The speaker in the poem says to the poet “(You) sing, riding’s a joy! For me, I ride”. How does this statement contrast the fate of the two?
Answer:
The lover illustrates his point by referring to the fate of a poet. A poet no doubt is more skilful than other artists. But his reward too meagre. His life is also a failure. In his poetry he expresses the view that sublime ideals and beautiful things are best and men should try to achieve them.

All this is a great achievement for a poet. But he dies in poverty even in the prime of life. He never achieves his own sublime ideals in life. A poet can only sing that riding with one’s beloved is a source of great pleasure. But he does never actually enjoy this pleasure. The lover considers himself more lucky in this respect for he is actually enjoying a ride with his beloved.

Question 3.
To the man of music, the speaker says “I gave my youth, but we ride, in fine.” How does he prove his achievement greater than that of this man of music?
Answer:
While comparing his fate with that of other artists like a man of music, the lover finds himself in a better position. The musician is also an unsuccessful artist. He devotes all his life to his art. He grows old in composing sweet tunes. But the only praise that he gets even from his friends is that he composed great music. But then fashion and taste in music change and his achievements become outdated.

Similarly, the lover in this poem devoted his youth, the prime of his life, in courting his beloved but now he has been rejected. But he has his reward tp enjoy the pleasure of the last ride in his beloved’s company. The musician can never enjoy such a fulfilment.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 17 The Last Ride Together

Question 4.
Discuss ‘The last Ride together’ as a dramatic monologue. (M.P. 2010, Imp., 16)
Answer:
The last Ride together is a dramatic monologue and it shows Browning at his best in the handling of this poetic form. It has also been called a dramatic lyric because it is not an expression of his own personal emotions, but that of an imagined character. It is spoken by a lover who loved his lady over a long paned of lime, and who, after making him wait for so long, finally rejected him, and turned to another lover.

The lover then prayed to her to grant two requests of his. First, that she should remember his love of her, and secondly, that she should come with him for a last ride together. To his great joy the lady consented.

The entire poem is a dramatic monologue. The lover is proving out his emotions, actually in front of none. He seems to be talking to himself in loneliness. He analyzes his own courting and persuasion of his beloved and its ultimate result. But instead of getting disheartened over his miserable failure, he finds consolation in the consent of his lady love for going on the last ride with him. The sheer imagination of proximity fills him with thrill and sense of fulfilment.

Question 5.
Discuss in detail Browning as a poet of love. (Imp.)
Answer:
Although the poem is dominated by intellectual analysis it yet shows Browning as a singer of passionate love. The intensity of emotion characterises many of the lines in the poem. As the lover’s heart overflows with love, some of his statements become highly charged with feelings and emotions.

For instance when his beloved is considering his final request for a ride he feels it like life and death in the balance and as if the circulation of his blood has stopped. When she agrees to his proposal, he feels that the circulation of his blood has started again and he experiences a feeling of elation.

When she leans against him, he feels as if he is in heaven. There is a passionate quality in the whole of the third stanza in which he describes how a lover’s passion might draw cloud, sunset, moonrise and star shine down on himself, near and yet more near, till flesh must fade for heaven was here! The lover experiences intense joy and intense fear when the beloved leans against him and lingers.

It is a moment of ecstasy for him. When the ride actually begins he feels that his soul has smoothed itself out like a long cramped scroll freshening and fluttering in the wind.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 16 Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 16 Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
What did general Seizo Arisue inform Rash Bihari Bose and what was Rash Bihari’s reaction? (M.P. 2016)
Answer:
General Seizo invited R.B.Bose in order to know his mind about Netaji’s coming. He asked Mr. Bose discreetly that Netaji was desirous of coming over there and he wondered how Mr. Bose would treat Netaji. Ras Bihari Bose the old revolutionary quietly replied that Netaji was a born under of Leader and he (Bose) would of course be quite pleased to ask him (Netaji) to take over from him.

Question 2.
How can you say that Netaji had a gift of judging the character Of his men? (M.P. 2013, Imp.)
Answer:
Netaji had a gift of judging the character of the man which served him to put the right man at the right place at the right time and on the right job. He picked up some of the soldiers from the dust and made heroes out of them.

Question 3.
What was Netaji’s way of dealing with defaulters? (M.P. 2010)
Answer:
Netaji had a tremendous power of judging a man’s character. So he always chose the right man for a right job. He never failed to appreciate when appreciation was due. A good word from him made the soldiers to strive to do their job well. He had a very kind heart. He never punished anybody. He always gave a defaulter an advice in a way that the defaulter may get a chance to improve himself.

Question 4.
How did Netaji’s love and appreciation bring a change in his men?
Answer:
Netaji was an ideal leader. He took care of all his subordinates with all compassion. He appreciated when appreciation was due. He never punished anyone. Instead he advised them to realize their weakness and improve upon them. His man were so much impressed with him that they were ready to do anything for him and under his command. His appreciation made them feel proud.

Question 5.
Give an example of Netaji’s power of observation and prediction of some future events in war.
Answer:
Netaji had a remarkable power of observation and could predict an event correctly. Once Netaji wrote a small note to the author on the Margin of the routine order. It was scribbled in his own hand. He told the author that as the mail was getting ready to be dispatched, he waited to advise him that instead of expecting the enemy at a particular map reference. The note was written about 500 Kilometers from the author. But it was accurate.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 16 Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose

Question 6.
What was Netaji’s firm faith about the freedom of India and what did the British officers think about that? (M.P. 2017)
Answer:
Netaji was very much confident that India would get freedom. He used to say often. “There is no power on earth that can keep India enslaved. India shall be free and before long.” The enemy officers used to mark at the statement. They thought it just illusory and a face saving device. Actually Netaji had a plan which was beyond the comprehension of profession soldiers.

Question 7.
How did the high spirits of the INA bring a change in the minds and actions of the Indian Soldiers in the British forces?
Answer:
Netaji kept the INA in the field even in the face of defeat. He wanted his soldiers to pay the price of liberty not only when they were on the advance but also during the retreat while going away from India not to win a territory but to continue fighting against the British force who were holding India in bondage.

These forces consisted of a greater number of Indian soldiers who pondered that why the INA with their poor strength and poorer equipment yet higher spirit were fighting against British. It created a psychological resolution. The war ended and with it ended the slavish mentality of the Indian soldiers. Such was the vision and plan of action of Netaji.

Question 8.
What was Netaji’s proposal during the annual session of the Indian National Congress? (M.P. 2014, Imp.)
Answer:
Netaji proposed that the Congress should at once send an ultimatum to the British government demanding independence within six months and should prepare immediately for a national struggle.

Question 9.
What did Netaji do before dealing with the situation? (Imp.)
Answer:
Netaji before dealing with a situation, used to read well and do his homework to observe and understand the task well. When he had to see anybody, he would learn all about the person and his problems before the interview.

Question 10.
How did Netaji improve his men by punishing or by counselling them? (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
Netaji had a gift of judging the character of the man. He never failed to appreciate when appreciation was due. He had a very kind heart and never punished anybody. Thus, he improved his men by counselling them and by giving an advice to the defaulters so that he could improve himself.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 16 Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose

II. Answer the following questions in about 75 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
How did Netaji act in the following situations and with what result?
(i) When he had to meet somebody
(ii) In making the best use of the abilities of his men.
Answer:
Netaji was a seasoned man. He was polite, courteous and well behaved. He had the capacity to manage every situation in his favour. He had a tremendous power to judge a man. Before dealing with anyone or any situation he used to read and do homework about that situation. He was always careful about the man to whom he had to meet. He took care of the honour and position of the man.

He had a compassionate nature. He always respected other’s feelings. He had a gift of judging the character of a man which served him to put the right man at the right place at the right time. He never failed to appreciate when it was deserved.

Question 2.
Narrate the episode which surprised the author at the accuracy of Netaji’s power of judgement regarding an eventuality.
Answer:
Netaji could observe and predict accurately. Once the author was surprised when Netaji wrote a small note on the margin of a routine order. He advised him that instead of expecting the enemy at the particular point he should also watch at certain other point. He gave 6 figured map reference.

The note was written in Rangoon about 5000 kilometers away from the author. When the author received Netaji’s note he was surprised at the accuracy of Netaji’s judgement. The author was already facing the enemy where Netaji had pointed out to watch. This was a measure of Netaji’s skill at generalship.

Question 3.
Write a short note on Netaji’s military foresight.
Answer:
Netaji’s had tremendous military foresight. He was always accurate in his predictions or guess. One such incident was that Netaji once during the annual session of the Indian National Congress at Tripuri in Jabalpur in 1939 made a proposal to send an ultimatum to the British government demanding independence within six months and should prepare immediately for a national struggle.

His proposal, though opposed, was based on his appreciation of the European situation which was something beyond the understanding of the political leaders. But Netaji’s prediction turned to be correct. The war did break out within 6 months on 3rd September 1939.

Question 4.
How did the Indian people and the Indian soldiers in British army react when the INA Trials of the three great INA heroes began?
Answer:
The INA trial of the three military officers in India was a memorable event which brought about many changes in the Indian mass and the soldiers. When the British started this trial in the Red Fort they thought that the Indian people especially the soldiers would appreciate the British action against the INA officers. But it happened just the opposite.

As soon as the first INA trial of the three frontline commanders started on 5th Novemebr 1945, within a week disturbances broke out in Lahore followed by that in Lucknow then Kolkata where hundreds of demonstrators were injured and twenty killed in police firing.

Even after the first trial in which the three accused officers were released by the commander-in-chief the public demand to stop the future INA trials continued. It gave rise to anti-British sentiments culminating in the mutiny in various regiments all over India. The days of the British Raj in India were close to their ends.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 16 Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose

Question 5.
Write a note on the secular character of Netaji and his provisional Government of Azad Hind. (Imp.)
Answer:
Netaji was a man of great qualities. He was a great humanist, a seasoned commander, a compassionate leader, perfect visionary and a staunch secularist. The author had full confidence that they would get absolute justice from him and his government the forerunner of our government today. The complete personality and all embracing idea is distilled in the last but one para of the proclamation of provisional Government’ of Azad Hind.

In that proclamation Netaji said that the provisional Government is entitled to and hereby claim the allegiance of eveiy Indian. It guarantees religious liberty as well as equal rights and equal opportunities to all its citizens. It declared its firm resolve to pursue the happiness and prosperity of the whole nation and of all its parks, cherishing all the children of the nation equally and transcending all the differences cunningly fostered by alien government in the past.” It was a complete vision of Netaji.

Question 6.
There is a contradiction in the statement “Netaji’s power of generalship turned the defeat of the INA into the defeat of the British Raj”. Prove the truth of the statement on the basis of the text.
Answer:
This statement highlights the farsightedness and military observation of Netaji. He had a tremendous power of calculating the future situation. When he proposed for sending an ultimatum to British government demanding independence within six months he was foreseeing the future events.

The war broke out within six months. He had a plan which was beyond the comprehension of professional soldiers. He kept the INA in the field even in the face of defeat. It created a psychological revolution. The war ended and with it ended the slavish mentality of the Indian army.

It gave rise to anti-raj activity all over India even in the military camps of Bombay, Karachi, Jabalpur Netaji’s plan of action had transformed the British Indian army into the Indian army. His powers of Generalship turned the defeat of the INA into the defeat of the British raj.

Question 7.
In what respect can Netaji’s Provisional Government of Azad Hind be called the forerunner of our Government today?
Answer:
Netaji was a great visionary. In order to find a solution to Indian freedom he crossed the sea and organised his own army. He approached to Indian freedom was not supported by the rightist leaders is India. It was his quality that the author feels confident to get absolute justice from him and his government the forerunner of the government today. The Indian constitution after the freedom accepted the high ideal of equality, justice secularism which were the vision of Netaji.

Question 8.
Make a general assessment of Netaji as: (Imp.)
(a) A man of brave but kind heart, as.
(b) A man of keen insight and foresight.
Answer:
Netaji was a complete man. He practised what he preached. He cared not only for the honour, welfare and comfort of his soldiers but also respected their feelings. He had a compassionate nature. His soldiers were overwhelmed with his concerns individually and collectively. He used to help his own staff officers to wash hands by pouring water and offering his own towel to scrub hands.

He used to shed tears on hearing about the difficulties of his soldiers and took immediate steps to supply relief. He was a rare leader of man in war.He had power of observation. He was gifted with insight and foresight whatever he did was accurate in result. He did whatever he could for the freedom of India. By putting INA in war he proved how a defeated soldier can win a greater victory.

The defeat in war of the British Indian Army gave a new identity of Indian Army. It transformed the whole scene. So what he did was beyond comprehension of a profession soldiers.

Question 9.
Explain the spirit of the last but one para of the proclamation of the provisional Government of Azad Hind.
Answer:
Netaji’s complete personality is revealed in the distilled form in the last but one para of the proclamation of provisional Government of Azad Hind. In this proclamatory para he talks about the ideas of his government.

A political loyalty is claimed on the part of the government for it guarantees religious liberty as well as equal rights and equal opportunities to all its citizens. It declares its firm resolve to pursue the happiness and prosperity of the whole nation and of all parts, cherishing all the children of the nation equally and transcending all the differences cunningly fostered by alien government in the past. In short Netaji wished for a welfare and complete democratic government.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 15 To Autumn

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 15 To Autumn

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
What does the Autumn plan to do with the cottage trees? (M.P. 2014, Imp.)
Answer:
The Autumn plans to load the cottage trees with apples and fill all fruit with ripeness to the core. It wants to swell the ground and plump the hazel shells with a sweet kernal. The Autumn and the sun work together for the ripening of all kinds of fruit.

Question 2.
Why does Autumn intend to ‘set budding’ the latesummer flowers?
Answer:
Autumn is described as a season of fruitfulness. There is mist of mellow fruitfulness. Fruits attain their maturity. The season intends to ‘set budding’ the late summer flowers so that the bees can suck the perfect sweetness. They store fresh honey.

Question 3.
How are the honey-combs after the summer and how do the bees feel?
Answer:
The bees here represent a continuation of summer. For the bees, the warm days of summer have not ended. The sticky cells of the honey combs are overflowing with honey and yet Autumn provides more flowers in case the bees may like to draw more sweetness from them.

Question 4.
How can Autumn be seen as a harvester?
Answer:
The poet has personified Autumn in various forms. All the forms are perfect and realistic. Autumn is seen as a harvester. He is sitting carelessly in the field during a winnowing operation. Here the poet uses all the images to make the picture more vivid.

The Autumn is shown sitting carelessly on a granary floor. Her hair is soft lifted by the winnowing wind. She is sometimes in sound sleep on a half reaped furrow. She is drowsed with the fume of poppies while her look spares the next swath and all its twined flowers.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 15 To Autumn

Question 5.
Describe the scene of the earth at sun-set. (M.P. 2011, Imp.)
Answer:
Keats has presented his keen observation with all minute details. The whole poem demonstrates his interest in nature. While describing the scene at sun-set, he says that in the evening when the crimson light of the setting sun falls upon the stubble fields a chorus of natural sound is heard. This picture is very appealing.

Question 6.
Do you find a reminder of sadness at some point in the poem? How does the poet overcome the sad moment and become happy?
Answer:
Keats presents a vivid picture of Autumn in this poem. Beginning with a very sensuous picture of the season. But towards the end of the poem he becomes sad. The Autumn is shown as its fog end. There are images of death or withdrawal and of song and the songs are funeral dirge for the dying year.

Question 7.
How does the poet address Autumn? (M.P. 2013, 15, 18)
Answer:
The poet has presented a lively picture of the Autumn. He addresses the Autumn as “Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness”. The Autumn is seen as a person in various roles – as a reaper a winnower, a gleaner and a cider makes.

II. Answer the following questions in about 75 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
Prove that ‘Ode to Autumn’ is a song of ripenes and abundance. (Imp.)
Answer:
‘Ode to Autumn’ is a typical poem of John Keats. This poem describes the Autumn season. The poet personifies the season and presents its all sensuousness. Autumn is described as a season of ‘mellow-fruitfulness’. The sun is ripening or ‘maturing’ the earth. It conspires to load the vines and blend the apple tree and ‘to swell the ground and plump the hazel shells’.

The season fills ‘all fruits with ripeness to the core.’ These images of full, inward ripeness and strain suggest that the maturing and the fulfillment has reached its climax. Even the cells of the bees are over brimmed. Still the ripening continues. ‘Budding more and still more later flowers.’ It is therefore, this poem can be said a song of ripeness and abundance.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 15 To Autumn

Question 2.
What are the two friends-Autumn and warm sun-planning to do with fruits and flowers?
Answer:
‘Ode to Autumn’ presents a sensuous picture of Autumn. Autumn is a season of ripe fruitfulness. It is the time of the ripening of grapes, apples, gourds, hazel nuts etc. It is also the time when the bees suck the sweetness from the later flowers and make honey. The sun plays a major role in maturing or ripening these fruits.

It is the main conspirator with the ripening and maturing of the fruits the poet suggests a sort of fulfilness. There are indirect images of aging. Autumn and the sun are close bosom friends.

Question 3.
What are the four images of personification through which Autumn has been picturized? (Imp.)
Answer:
The poem ‘Ode to Autumn’ presents Autumn’s vivid images. The poet personifies it in fair images – as a winnower, as a reaper, as a gleaner and as a cider-presser. Autumn is seen as a women who performs the task of winnowing reaping gleaning and cider pressing. First we can see women, i.e. Autumn into the fields engaged in the winnowing operations, while breeze ruffles their locks of hair.

Secondly, we see Autumn in the form of a reaper, who has been engaged in reaping com but who in the course of her work is so overcome by the sleep-inducing smell of poppies. Thirdly, Autumn can be seen in the image of a gleaner who is walking along steadily with the weight of grains upon her head crossing a stream.

Finally Autumn may be seen in the image of a women who is crushing the ripe apples in the wine press to obtain their juice from which cider is to be made. This women sits by the cider-press and watches patiently the apple juice slowing out of the press drop-by-drop.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 14 Albert Einstein at School

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 14 Albert Einstein at School

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
While going through the conversation between Albert and his history teacher, what sort of person does Einstein appear to you?
Answer:
While going through the conversation between Einstein and the history teacher we realize that Einstein was a man of practical ideas. His insistence on not uarning the dates of history does not mean that he is not interested in them. It rather tells that he was more interested in its causative sense.

Education was not all about cramming for him. His view though expressed long back are still relevant but yet to be understood and implemented by self proclaimed architects and Gods of modern education.

Question 2.
How does a tight administrative system usually check students from exploring new horizons?
Answer:
It is quite true that the school often curbs individual talents. Most of the time it is unproductive and outdated. Education must bring out the best from within. Education received within the confinement may not be the real education. It has been seen that schools interfere with the free growth and development of children. They don’t provide conducive atmosphere for their proper growth.

Too many restrictions and formalities stunt the natural growth in students. Too much of discipline is always unproductive and chokes the talent. It makes them timid, rather then encouraging than to explore new horizons.

Question 3.
What is Einstein’s theory of education?
Answer:
According to Einstein education is not confined to mere information gathering. In his view information gathering has its limitations. It can be easily gathered from any good book on history. Einstein thinks that learning of days, dates and figures have no meaning or importance.

What is important are the ideas. Ideas are the basis of education. So, insight formation must be the aim of education. Schools shouldn’t overburden students with the heaps of data collection.

The real growth and development of the mind is more important than mere informa¬tion gathering. Depth comes from the basics and not from facts and figures. Ideas are the essence of real education. Without the basics and ideas, education will be reduced to mere dead formalities and information gathering.

Question 4.
Why did Einstein think that he could never pass the exam for school diploma? (M.P. 2010)
Answer:
Einstein believed that he would never pass the exams for the school diploma. He thought so because he was in no way similar to the other students. He never lived to learn lessons. School was hateful place for him. He was going to school not for his own sake but for the sake of his father’s wishes.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 14 Albert Einstein at School

Question 5.
Why was Albert adamant on meeting a doctor?
Answer:
Albert never liked school. It was only due to his father that he attended the school. But finally he decided to leave it. As there was no way, he decided to get a medical certificate from a doctor which would help him prove that he was sick. For this, he asked his friend Yuri to fix an appointment with a doctor who was known to Yuri. He was ready to face any situation for this.

Question 6.
“There is nothing to wonder about, Einstein. I knew you were going to leave before you knew yourself.” What did Mr. Koch actually mean?
Answer:
Mr. Koch was the mathematics teacher in the school where Einstein studied when finally Einstein decided to leave the school he managed a certificate from a doctor about his nervous breakdown. But the head teacher was not convinced. He asked Einstein to get a certificate from any teacher of his school who could certify that he was not capable of teaching Einstein anymore.

First he tried Mr. Koch, the mathematics teacher. Mr. Koch was a very helpful man and really recognized the latent talent of Einstein. So he didn’t hesitate. He saw what possibilities were hidden in him. He knew that school can’t fulfil what Einstein needed. He made a remark. “There’s nothing to warder about Einstein. I knew you were going to leave before you knew yourself.”

Question 7.
Give a brief character sketch of Einstein. (M.P. 2010, 11, Imp.)
Answer:
Einstein was a peculiar child right from the beginning of his career. His views were different but rational. It was a fact that he had no interest in learning the facts. Einstein never liked school because in his view it was not a proper place for learning.

A strict rule is observed there and no chance is given to make a child’s latent talent flourish. He loved music and reading books on science. But he had no interest in the books prescribed in the syllabus. He had his own views about education. But in no way he was disrespectful to the teachers. After all he was a genius.

Question 8.
Where did Albert find a room to reside? (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
Albert’s financial condition was not very good. His father had little money to spare. So Albert found a room to reside in one of the poorest quarters of Munich. He stayed with lack of comfort, bad food, dirt and squalor, he hated the atmosphere of slum violence.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 13 On His Being Arrived at the Age of Twenty-three

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 13 On His Being Arrived at the Age of Twenty-three

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
What has time stolen from the poet? (M.P. 2013, Imp.)
Answer:
In this poem the poet makes a complaint blaming on the time that it has stolen the prime part of his life. Twenty-three years of his life passed away so hastily that the poet failed to mature himself. His career is not be perfect but his appearance is now mature. He feels that he still requires time for the maturity of his career.

Question 2.
What deceives the truth? (M.P. 2009)
Answer:
Here, the poet refers to his mature looking age. His appearance can deceive about his maturity which is still to be achieved. The time did not give him opportunity to attain the ripeness of his poetic talent. His appearance is deceiving.

Question 3.
What will be in the strictest measure?
Answer:
As this poem in devotional in tone, the poet says that whatever one gets or does it is the will of God. God distributes everything to everyone in the strictest measure. For him there is no distinction between high or low. He observes everything equally and allots everyone equally.

Question 4.
How does the poet console himself? (Imp.)
Answer:
The poet here feels sorry for he could not make his career properly. His talent is still unripe. Time has stolen twenty-three years of his life without notice. It has deceived him. But he consoles himself with the plea that whatever he has achieved was the wish of God. God gives only what one deserves without any reservations.

Question 5.
What passes by in a hurry in the poet’s life?
Answer:
The poet feels himself at a great loss. He thinks that he has lost twenty-three years of his life without any substantial achievement. It has passed so hastily that he could not notice the bud or blossom. Though, he has attained maturity of age but he still needs time for attaining the maturity of his career.

Question 6.
What is approaching the poet fas?
Answer:
The poet says that he is now grown up. The state of manhood is approaching fast to him. He has lost his youth the formative period of his life, but as he is sorry to the loss of youth he feels the manhood that is approaching him is a loss to him.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 13 On His Being Arrived at the Age of Twenty-three

II. Answer the following questions in about 75 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
Briefly describe Milton’s feelings on his having arrived at the age of twenty-three. (MP 2011)
Answer:
‘On his being arrived at the age of twenty-three’ is Milton’s reflections on his late maturing. He has attained the age of twenty-three. He thinks it as a loss. He feels that it has approached in such a manner that he could not notice it. The prime of his life is lost. He couldn’t buildup his career. He couldn’t achieve the height of his poetic talent. He feels to be cheated or deceived by the time which has taken away his ripening period without notice. The poet is not at all happy. But one thing gives him relief that it was the will of God.

Question 2.
Critically analyse the poem. (M.P. 2018)
Answer:
The poem ‘On his Being Arrived at the Age of Twenty-three’ is devotional sonnet written in an autobiographical mood. It contains Milton’s reflections of late maturing. The dominating’ passion of his life is to justify the ways of God to man and write in praise of God. Here he blames time for stealing away his youth without ripening his poetic talent. He uses the sonnet form of poetry to produce a personal utterance that combines dignity of tone, flexibility of movement and mastery of structure.

Question 3.
Analyse the poem as a Petrarchan Sonnet.
Answer:
Sonnet is a short poem of fourteen lines expressing a single thought or emotion at a time. It is owes its popularization to the 14th century Italian poet Francesco Petrarch who used this poetic form to express his love for his idealised lady love, Laura. John Milton uses the original Italian (Petrarchan) form to express his devotion to God, or sublime feelings. In this form the poem is divided into two parts – the octave (a stanza of eight lines) and the sestet (a stanza of six lines).

The first part makes a statement, or puts up a question while the second part illustrates, or serve the answer to it. “On the Being Arrived at the age of Twenty-three” is a devotional sonnet in Petrarchan form. It is a striking example of the Renaissance ethos and Reformation zeal. It is an assertion of faith and a wish to be guided by the divine will.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 12 Youth and the Tasks Ahead

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 12 Youth and the Tasks Ahead

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
Why does the author want our youth to be physically and intellectually strong?
Answer:
Dr. Karan Singh, a great political thinker, puts his candid views about the youth of our nation. He invokes that our youth must be equipped with physical and intellectual dimensions. Because building a great democracy and defending it from predatory, aggressors requires a young generation that is physically strong with muscles of iron and nerves of steel.

Question 2.
What should the youth do to become intellectually competent?
Answer:
The author feels our youth must be equipped with intellectual capabilities in order to compete with the highly competitive age of science and technology. Moreover the challenges before them are greater than those of their predecessors. Hence they must obtain high academic abilities.

Those who go to schools or colleges are the privilege elite for there are a lot in our country who fast even to attain primary education. So the students should not lose even a moment in false or disruptive pursuits, but strain every nerve to become able and efficient in their respective fields of study.

Question 3.
What does the author mean by patriotism? (Imp.)
Answer:
Patriotism is one of the important dimensions that a youth must acquire. By patriotism the author means the deeper patriotism which transcend all pettiness and exclusivism which creates in our youth a deep urge for national unity and progress. The author feels that this can eradicate corruption and nepotism from our nation and galvanize the whole process of our economic development.

Question 4.
Why is it necessary for our youth to be spiritually strong? (M.P. 2013, 16, 17)
Answer:
The author feels that for our youth it is necessary to equip themselves with spiritual dimension which is the main faculty that distinguishes human beings from the myriad other forms of life. Spiritualism leads to fearlessness and dynamism even at the crucial hours and are overcome all difficulties. By spiritualism the author doesn’t mean merely denominational religion, but the string of unity which runs through all religions and from which they all ultimately derive power and sustenance.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 12 Youth and the Tasks Ahead

Question 5.
What, according to the writer, are the things to be done for strengthening the country?
Answer:
In this address to the youth of our country Dr. Karan Singh puts forth his high ideals in the interest of the country. First he thinks the youth of a nation must be equipped with physical, intellectual, patriotic and spiritual dimensions.

These will help them defend the country’s idealism and values. They will strengthen our great democracy. Corruption, nepotism and pettiness need to be eradicated. We must have a feeling of unity above all political, communal, regional and injustice diversities.

Question 6.
When Dr. Karan Singh speaks about spirituality, what does he means by it? (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
Dr. Karan Singh, by spiritualism means the unity and power of sustenance.

II. Answer the following questions in about 75 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
Describe in brief, all the four dimensions in which our youth must equip themselves. (M.P. 2012, Imp.)
Answer:
In his exhortation to the youth, Dr. Karan Singh urges the youth of India to develop physical, intellectual, patriotic and spiritual qualities in order to fulfil their responsibilities towards the nation. The author explains these qualities in his own terms. Physical quality is needed for building a great democracy and defending it from predatory aggressors.

We need a young generation which should be physically strong, with iron muscles, and nerves of steel. For this they also require proper physical training in order to develop physical fitness to the maximum extent. It develops discipline and teammanship in them.

Next, the author talks of the intellectual qualities which our youth need in order to face the challenges of the highly sensitive competitive age of science and technology. They need to be more alert and competent than their predecessors. They must attain academic ability of the highest order so that they can serve the nation in a proper way.

The third dimension that the author feels necessary for the youth is the quality of patriotism for it transcends all pettiness and excluvism and creates in them a deep urge for national unity and progress. This alone can eradiate corruption and nepotism from our land this will galvanize the process of economic development.

Then finally the author talks of the supreme quality of spiritualism which distinguishes human being from the myriad other forms of life that exist on earth. At a time of deep crisis we must be endowed with a new spiritual fervour which leads to that fearlessness and dynamism whereby we can overcome all difficulties. Here spiritualism is the unity of all faiths living together in peace and harmony.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 12 Youth and the Tasks Ahead

Question 2.
What does the author expect from those who belong to the post-independence era?
Answer:
The author feels that we are living in a crucial age. We have suffered a lot under the long servitude and gained freedom after immense sacrifices. Now our responsibilities are far more greater than those of our predecessors. It is quite tough to keep our independence safe.

We have to build a great democracy and defend it also. We have to be more alert and competent to face the challenges in every sphere of life. We have to spread knowledge, eradicate corruption, pettiness and nepotism. We have to galvanize the whole process of economic development. The young generation has to bear all these responsibilities for they are the future of the nation.

For this author urges them to equip themselves with qualities like physical fitness, intellectual traits, patriotic feeling and spiritualism. These all together can give them confidence, courage and ability to face all challenges and help them make a great nation.

Question 3.
How according to Dr. Karan Singh can the youth repay their debt to society? (Imp.)
Answer:
According to Dr. Singh the youths can repay their debt of the nation in many ways. They can do their best to keep our country safe from the external attacks. They can spread knowledge among those who fail to go to schools or colleges. They can help the nation in eradicating corruption, pettiness, nepotism and all other diversities. They should spread the message of unity, peace and harmony. They can work everything for the welfare of the nation.

Question 4.
How can N.C.C. and other similar organizations help in making our youth physically strong?
Answer:
Physical fitness is one of the most first and foremost requirement for one to prove oneself victorious. Building a great democracy and defending it is a great task. It requires a young generation that is physically strong, with muscles of iron and nerves of steel. One can achieve and improve these qualities only by undertaking physical training and developing physical fitness to the maximum. N.C.C. and other such organizations are working in this field.

Physical fitness and the qualities of discipline and teammanship are essential particularly for those who are planning a job in defence forces. N.C.C. like organization train one in all these directions and make a young man competent enough to face all sorts of challenges in life.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 11 My Father Travels

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 11 My Father Travels

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
Why does father hurry on?
Answer:
The father in this poem represents the old values. He travels alone in the train standing among the old aged daily passengers with fearful look and depressed lot of humanity. He has a sense of attachment with the family. He hurries back home to have some quality time with his family. He feels overburdened with the feeling of values that he represents. He is tired and secluded.

Question 2.
Why does father tremble at the sink? (Imp.)
Answer:
The father comes back home. He eats stale chapatis and drinks weak tea. Nobody cares for him. He is as good as alone in the house because no one bothers for him. He is ignored by his grand children. Nobody shares his woes. He goes to toilet in order to ease himself. It also symbolises a feeling of detachment from the worldly burden of relationship. She trembles at the sink out of weakness.

Question 3.
Why does the poet call the children sullen? (M.P. 2009, 18)
Answer:
The poet calls the children sullen because the children of the modem age are different from the previous generation. They feel differently and do accordingly. They do not bother for the old generation. They have their own way of living. They have no time to care and stare at their grandparents. They lack affinity and feeling. It is the trend of modem civilization. Moral values are vanishing fast. Children are growing indisciplined and ignoring.

Question 4.
What does the poet suggest through the line-‘A few droplets cling the greying hair on his wrists’?
Answer:
The poet here focuses on the degrading moral values. In the modem civilization we ignore our old people. We do not bother to care them. They don’t get any proper care and regard. They feel themselves scorned and ignored. They are growing weak for the feeling of being alienated. The droplets clinging the greying hair on the wrists symbolise their unmindfulness of any sense of care.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 11 My Father Travels

Question 5.
What does the father contemplate in the toilet? (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
In the poem ‘My Father Travels’, the poet Dilip Chitre throws light on new generations thought process and their materialistic living, with degrading human values. The father contemplates over the degradation of traditional values and human relationships. He goes to toilet to relax himself and to get detached himself from the outer world.

II. Answer the following questions in about 75 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
Give the central idea of the poem.
Answer:
‘My Father Travels’ is a poem on the dehumanising growth of the modern civilization. It captures the predicament of an aged man in this dehumanised urban world. He feels depressed at the crumbling traditional value system and human relationships. The younger generation lacks sincere regards for their old generation.

They don’t bother to honour the traditional values and ways of life. They imitate the fast changing world pattern where there is no place for the old and aged, for them the old is not gold but stale and outdated. This is the negative aspect of the modernization.

Question 2.
Comment on the mood in the poem.
Answer:
The poem is written in a mood of deep concern for the changing world where we are losing our values. The poet is pensive. He through a father’s travel, puts his ideas about how the modernization affects us negatively. We are being detached from old values, our tradition and our ancestors.

The new generation has its own views and values. The old and the aged are ignored and neglected. The poet grows so depressed that he even thought of the nomads, this indicates that he finds the world of new generation not better than the world that was inhabited by nomads.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 10 On Umbrella Morals

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 10 On Umbrella Morals

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
How do people who pick things belonging to others satisfy their conscience?
Answer:
People who pick things belonging to others satisfy their conscience by expressing an apology to themselves that they hadn’t done it deliberately but by mistake. Sometime they say ‘Ah! I was going just to retrun it. I don’t know how did it happened.’ Such people if not caught won’t bother to feel sorry.

Question 2.
What has the author to say about morals concerning books?
Answer:
The author has a strong resentment for those who pick up other’s things. They do it deliberately. They don’t feel shy ‘If they are caught. They just say. I was surprized how did it happen?’ The author has the same dislike for those who take away books from library and never bother to retrun them. He advises us never to trust even our dearest friend. He has instances of even religious people who did not return books.

Question 3.
What does the author mean by ‘play hide and seek with our own conscience’? (M.P. 2017)
Answer:
The author is very much annoyed with the people’s habit of picking up other’s things. Usually they do it deliberately. They know that they are picking up a better thing and leaving their own inferior thing. They don’t feel shy. They don’t bother to return it even if the owner’s name is written there.

If caught they will simply say ‘Ah! I don’t know how did it happen ?‘ They show their ignorance but they feel happy. In this way they play hide and seek with their own conscience.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 10 On Umbrella Morals

II. Answer the following questions in about 75 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
What does the author say about “Umbrella conscience?” Mention some of its chief characteristics. Mention main four points. (M.P. 2012, 15)
Answer:
This essay is a satire on the modem culture where people have abandoned their moral compulsions. They do wrong but despite of being aware of don’t accept it. They don’t care for other’s trouble. The author gives many examples. He says that such people take your umbrellas made of silk and leave their own cotton umbrella in exchange. They take your books and never return.

They are not only ordinary people but some religious and even high profile people. They don’t feel shy. They do it only to appease their conscience. Sometimes they may feel sorry and say to you that they were just going to return it. But it is not the fact. They only play hide and seek with their own conscience.

Question 2.
Describe how and why did the author return the umbrella belonging to some politician? (Imp.)
Answer:
The author narrates a peculiar experience of his life. Once he got a silk umbrella in exchange somewhere. Later he found that there was a band with the owner and his address. It made him upset. It was a super umbrella. He was terrified. He thought that some day he may be caught in the charge of stealing an umbrella of a British empire. So he wrote letter of apology and went to dispatch it. Later he was invited.

When he went there he found a group of high profile people. Someone gave him a hat. Someone coat. Then he came to know that the silk umbrella had travelled a long series of exchange. He at last took a sigh of relief for he had not made any mistake.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 9 After Apple-Picking

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 9 After Apple-Picking

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
Why can’t the poet rub strangeness from his sight? (M.P. 2013)
Answer:
The poet is overtired of apple-picking. Still there are a lot to pick. He has gone sleepless for many nights. He is drowsing of the essence of the apples. Whatever he saw from the pane of his window, the fact is far more different. So he is amazed.

Question 2.
What is implied by the phrase, ‘Just some human sleep’?
Answer:
Here the expression ‘Just for human sleep’ implies that human beings are made to have a little rest after working for a certain duration. It is the need of his physical system which refreshes him to enable him to work again with energy. So he works in day and sleeps in night. Here as he is overtired he wishes just for human sleep.

Question 3.
What does the repeated reference to ‘sleep’ in the poem imply?
Answer:
In this poem the poet gives his reflections on boredom and drudgery in the after math of the task of picking apple. He has got overtired. He is feeling drowsiness. He has gone sleepless. Again and again he talks of ‘sleep’ for he needs it the most. Sleep is here used as a rejuvenating factor in a man’s life.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 9 After Apple-Picking

II. Answer the following questions in about 75 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
Give the central idea of the poem. (M.P. 2009)
Answer:
After Apple-Picking is a well-known poem on man’s encounter with the natural world, probing dilemma of his existence. Here the poet gives reflections on boredom and drudgery in the aftermath of the task of picking apples. The overtired apple-picker fails to enjoy his life amid the pristine natural beauty. The poem is trapped in the utilitarian ways of modem civilization. Its central theme is that modem civilization marked by the culture of excessive work for increasing material gain to no end.

Question 2.
Justify the title of the poem. ‘After Apple-Picking’. (M.P. 2017 Imp.)
Answer:
‘After Apple-Picking’ is a suitable title for this poem. In this poem the poet gives his feelings for the overstrained civilization and way of modem life. Through the work of apple-picking he explains his ideas. Apple symbolises a fruit of high worth from every point of view. The poet has a bumper harvest of apple and while picking it up gets overtired. Every situation reflects the poet’s view and all through apple.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 8 The Beggar

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 8 The Beggar

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
Why was Lushkov, the beggar compelled to beg?
Answer:
When Lushkov approached Skvortsov for help he was caught in an unexpected situation. He told Skvortsov mat He was hungry. He had not tasted food for three days. He had not five-kopeck piece for a nignt s lodging. He added that he was once a school master in a village and had lost his post through a conspiracy.

He wanted to convince Skvortsov with his plea that he was a victim of false witness. He was out of place for a year. Now he had been offered a post in the kaluga province. But he had no means for the journey. Hence he was begging for help compelled by the situation.

Question 2.
Why did the beggar get a merciless scolding? (M.P. 2012)
Answer:
The beggar approached Skvortsov. He began to explain his helplessness and tried to convince him for help. But the narrator recollected that he was the man who just a day back was begging in the name of an expelled student. This time he was begging in the name of a school master.

He was using the name of a school master and a student in order to attract sympathy of people. It made the narrator angry and he scolded him mercilessly and also threatened to hand him over to police.

Question 3.
“I cannot get on without lying” said the beggar. Why did he say so? (M.P. 2010)
Answer:
The narrator was very angry with the beggar for he was using the name of a student or a village school master in order to exploit the sentiments of public. When he scolded him and threatened to call the police the beggar was scared. He immediately confessed that he was lying. But he said he had no option other than lying.

Whenever he neither a student nor a school master but was in a Russian choir and was turned out of it for drunkenness. Truth couldn’t give him food. He was dying of hunger and freezing in cold. So he was compelled to lying.

Question 4.
As soon as the beggar was offered a job, he refused it and made excuses. What were the excuses?
Answer:
Lushkov said that he was not able to get any job. Skvortsov offered him a job. As Lushkov was not willing to do labour he refused it by giving excuses. He said that he won’t get manual work. He couldn’t do shopman’s job or a trade’s job. As he was not of a class of house porter he won’t get this job. He was not a skilled person so he can’t do any work. Finally when Skvortsov gave him the job of wood chopping he said that it was not a regular one.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 8 The Beggar

Question 5.
Olga behaved with the beggar very badly. Was her behaviour real? Justify your answer.
Answer:
Olga was the maidservant of Skvortsov, when Skvortsov offers the job of wood chopping to Lushkov he deputes. Olga to observe the work. Olga, feels irritated with Lushkov as he was a drunkard. He was always not in proper state of mind.

Olga abused him and talked to him in a rude manner saying that he was unlucky fellow with no gladness in life. These words were very hurting. But she also chopped the wood herself and told Skvortsov that Lushkov had done it. It shows that her rudeness was just to hurt Lushkov so that he could change himself. Finally it happened.

Question 6.
Did Skvortsov really succeed in reforming the beggar? Give reasons to support your answer.
Answer:
Skvortsov was a man of perfection. He scolded Lushkov for his begging. He wanted to reform that man. So he offered him job with a promise that he would give him regular work. Lushkov come to do wood chopping regularly. It impressed Skvortsov and he sent him to one of his friends of some office work. It changed Lushkov’s life completely. He came to a very good position. Had Skvortsov not helped Lushkov he would have been still begging. So Skvortsov succeeded in reforming the life of a beggar.

Question 7.
“It was the attitude, not the words that brought about a change in the beggar.” Explain. (Imp.)
Answer:
Skvortsov gave Lushkov the work of wood chopping and he deputed his maid-servant Olga to supervise his work. Olga used to get irritated very soon. When she saw a man-Lushkov-who was not in his proper mental condition. She got irritated. Lushkov was in drunken stage. He was feeble and weak.

He was not working properly. So Olga began, scolding him. She called him unlucky poor drunkard and said that he was a sorrowful creature and that he would go in hell. This was all for bringing about a change by hurting his heart and it worked well. Lushkov changed himself completely and got a good position and earnings.

First the words of Skvortsov who scolded him for begging later Olga’s words were very harsh and cruel. But the words were with good intention. So here the attitude behind the words were more important which changed Lushkov’s life pattern.

II. Answer the following questions in about 30 words each:

Question 1.
Why was Skvortsov angry with the beggar? (M.P. 2014, Imp.)
Answer:
This story, ‘The Beggar’ is about a man who was turned out of the Russian choir for drunkness and he took to lying and begging. While begging he meets Skvortsov, the narrator, and introduces him as a student expelled. Skvortsov was angry with the beggar because the very next day he saw the beggar, begging in the name of a school-master, to earn sympathy from people.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 8 The Beggar

Question 2.
What was the reason that made Skvortsov feel ashamed and sore? (Imp.)
Answer:
Skvortsov felt ashamed and sore at the thought that he had found a pampered, drunken and sick man to do hard rough work in cold.

Question 3.
Why did Olga shed tears over the beggar?
Answer:
Olga shed tears over the beggar because she wanted to bring about a change in the beggar’s soul and his work attitude.

Question 4.
What made Skvortsov so happy when he met the beggar at the theatre? (M.P. 2015)
Answer:
Skvortsov became happy when he met the beggar at the theatre because he felt that it was because of his effort, the beggar was on the right path and also that he had remembered his words of advice for improving his conduct and career.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 7 A Prayer for My Daughter

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 7 A Prayer for My Daughter

I. Answer the following questions in about 50 – 60 words each:

Question 1.
What do the words, ‘the future years had come’ symbolize in the poem?
Answer:
This expression symbolizes years imagination about the coming days in context of the situation prevailing then. He fears about the coming time that might be full of violence and blood shed that had already started showing its sings.

Question 2.
What is the poet’s opinion about ‘overmuch beauty’? Does he want his daughter to possess it? (M.P. 2009, 18)
Answer:
The poet wants his daughter to be beautiful but not that much, that make a stranger’s eyes distraught. He feels that overmuch beauty can disturb and distract. Beautiful women take their beauty as an end in itself. They forget their natural kindness.

Question 3.
What are the evil effects of ‘Horn of Plenty’? (M.P. 2010)
Answer:
Hatred is the worst civil according to the poet. It makes one obstinate and vain. Horn of Plenty symbolises plenty of flowers, fruits and com and thus are symbol of prosperity. But those ladies who are laden with prosperity of beauty ruin their life by making wrong choices due to vanity. As Maud Gonne spoiled her beauty and doomed to her misfortune.

Question 4.
What qualities grow when the mind is without hatred? (M.P. 2011, Imp.)
Answer:
If the soul is free from hatred, no misfortune can ruin the innocence and cheerfulness of a person. His daughter if not touched by hatred, would be capable of enjoying inner peace and happiness. Her soul would be able to find its fulfillment within itself. She would remain always happy even in the midst of misfortune and the hostility of the world.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 7 A Prayer for My Daughter

Question 5.
Why does the poet want his daughter to have a life of custom and ceremony?
Answer:
The poet wants his daughter to have a life of custom and ceremony. He prays that his daughter may be married in a good, aristocratic family. He thinks so because tradition always follows high spiritual values. There is no place for arrogance and hatred these. Arrogance and hatred is the trait of the masses or the commoners. The aristocratic way of life, however, is rooted in custom and tradition. Culture preserves spiritual values and is itself preserved by ceremony and tradition.

Question 6.
Explain the legend of Helen and Paris.
Answer:
Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda. She was extraordinarily beautiful. She out of her arrogance eloped with Prince Paris of Troy. This elopement brought destruction of Troy. Her life too was ruined.

II. Answer the following questions in about 75 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
In the poem ‘A Prayer for my daughter’ nature in both its aspects-wild and joyous-serves as a background. Explain and illustrate.
Answer:
The poem ‘A Prayer for My Daughter is typical poem of W. B. Yeats. It appears to be quite simple but the poet has enriched it with certain images. The violence of nature thunderous innocence of the sea is symbolic of the violence of man. The poet gives many examples of great beauties like Helen who represents Maud Gonne, Venus and their beauty proved disastrous for them. There are some images from nature also.

The wind and tree are to be found throughout. First stormy wind outside, and then the horn of plenty is transformed into-a windy instrument. Maud Gonne has taken ‘old bellows full of angry wind’. The spreading laurel-tree, which stands for tradition and customs is mentioned twice.

The intellectual hatred as of Maude Gonne brings its own punishment and the innocence and courtesy can, however, serve as a refuge or shelter against every ‘windy quarter’ or ‘bellows burst’. All these symbols give great significance to the thoughts expressed in the poem. It is quite apt to say that the poem contains ‘rich stores in a little room’.

Question 2.
What virtues does the poet want his daughter to be blessed with? (Imp.)
Answer:
Because of his fear about a violent future the poet prays for safety of his new born daughter. He thinks that the only pressure shield is to inculcate some inner virtue which will give comfort to his daughter. If his daughter can have some virtues that would make her strong, But he has not prayed for any Christian virtues for his daughter.

He has only wished for certain abstract qualities – like innocence, freedom, kindness and gladness. He has not mentioned how these qualities can be built up. The poet has expressed his faith in tradition and ceremony but in a world of changing values it may be very difficult to preserve them under the stream of modem civilization. The poet is rather idealistic and has not addressed himself to the challenges which the world is facing today.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions Chapter 7 A Prayer for My Daughter

Question 3.
Why does the poet want his daughter to be free from ‘intellectual hatred’ and ‘opinionated mind’? (Imp.)
Answer:
The poet in order to make his daughter’s future safe wants her to acquire some virtues which is the only way that can protect one from the bad days which have already creeped in. He feels that intellectual hatred is the worst kind of evil and a severe blow to the character.

So he would like his daughter abandon strong and stubborn opinions on any subject political or otherwise. He would like his daughter to avoid the weaknesses of Maud Gonne. It was because of her strongly held opinions. She was led to act foolishly. All her beauty and her good upbringing proved to be useless. She ruined her life by choosing a worthless person as John MacBryde for a husband.

So he wants his daughter to be free from ‘all intellectual hatred’ and ‘opinionated mind’ for only then she would be capable of enjoying inner peace and happiness and she would keep herself happy even in the midst of misfortune and the hostility of the world.

Question 4.
Why does the poet so much worried about the future of his new-born daughter? (M.P. 2014)
Answer:
The poem ‘A Prayer for My Daughter’ is a personal poem of W.B. Yeats. It reflects the gloom of the poet and his fear of a stormy future. As this poem was written after the First World War, it reflects the post-war frustration. This poem, written soon after the birth of his daughter Annie, can be clearly comprehended with the background Yeat’s poem ‘The Second Coming’ written a month before the birth of his daughter.

In ‘The Second Coming’ the poet had a vision suggesting the end of the Christian era (an age of piety and rituals) and the advent of a new barbaric age. Besides the bloodshed in Ireland, consequent upon the Easter Rebellion of 1916 and the outbreak of Irish Civil War accompanied by World War-I had already filled the poet’s mind with gloomy forebodings.

The painful moments of the failures of his love affair with Maud Gonne were also in his mind. So the poet is scared for the safety of his daughter’s future and prays for her safe future by providing her shield of protection.

MP Board Class 12th Special English Important Questions